Binary Options Tips - Ten Easy Trading Tricks

Binary Options Tips and Tricks - Real Trading Strategy

Binary Options Tips and Tricks - Real Trading Strategy submitted by ultimatefxtools to u/ultimatefxtools [link] [comments]

Binary Options OTC Tips and Tricks - Real Account

Binary Options OTC Tips and Tricks - Real Account submitted by ultimatefxtools to u/ultimatefxtools [link] [comments]

E-books Free Download: Tips and tricks on trading binary options and forex - Make money in 60s

E-books Free Download: Tips and tricks on trading binary options and forex - Make money in 60s submitted by tipssoft to FreeEBOOKS [link] [comments]

Tricks And Tips For Successful Binary Options.

submitted by davidgreenoptions to binaryoption [link] [comments]

essay tipsssss from a perfect 24 scorer. Also if you have questions I will answer them. GOOD LUCK OCTOBER!!!!!

Hey lovelies, so I made a perfect score on the SAT essay, but I am an embarrassment at everything else, so this is just to say that an essay score doesn’t define you and is overall not as important as it could be. Also this is my own experience, I AM IN NO WAY A WRITING TEACHER, SO PLEASE DON’T COME AT ME IN THE COMMENTS.
My best advice: Write conspiracy theories for every essay
If I had to describe the tone of my writing it would be an academic high on crack.
so buckle up y’all. Also my internationals, I feel ya bc I am not native either- woohoo join the train
Now let’s get down to the actual essay.
My best advice is memorize an essay format because if you are like me and you cry in every section ( I am not even joking) the essay can be a trainwreck of panic, and no one needs that toxic energy in their last section.
So here’s my format:
This is my introduction:
While the narrative of the 21st century human experience has resulted in [problem], the underlying causes are most often unexamined. In the article, “”, the author carefully deals with the underlying reasons for [problem] and overtly advocates for [], and hopes in the end to [ purpose]. While doing so he employs several literary elements, including….
Note about purpose: this is given in the prompt, so all you have to do is reformat it.
Now for the devices and body paragraphs
GO IN CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER!!!!!!
Pick out three devices:
Now here is the format for these devices:
  1. Word choice
    1. evokes emotions or images
    2. characterizes the subject in a particular way
    3. sets the
    4. cultivate émotions
    5. associate positive or negative connotations with something
  2. Statistics/ Data
    1. indicate a problem
      1. point us towards a bigger issue
    2. make something harder to argue because numbers are perceived as facts, not opinions
    3. to effectively ground the authors argument
    4. to surprise readers
    5. to put a quantity in relation to another and effectively contrast
  3. Appeal to Authority
    1. raise credibility by showing that the author is not the only one who believes in this idea
    2. increase trust by showing that the argument is indeed well researched
    3. gain the same acceptance or authority that the authority figure derives from the reader
    4. establish a precedent that pushes people to act in the way that author wants them to behave
  4. Acknowledges the other side/making concessions
    1. address counterarguments, doubts, or fears that the reader may have
    2. establish common ground
    3. pave the way for new arguments to be made
  5. Analogies/ Comparaisons
    1. allow the reader to understand more complex concepts by connecting them to ones that are much simpler
    2. associate new ideas with prior one
    3. which leads the reader into eventual agreement as if he agreed with a prior idea, it is likely he will agree with the new one
  6. Juxtaposition
    1. significant distinction is highlighted
    2. one option seems better than another
    3. create a binary mentality
  7. challenging assumptions
    1. enables this argument to proceed from a clean slate
    2. dismisses any preconceived ideas or biases that may run counter to his or her argument
  8. Anecdotes
    1. form an emotional bond with the reader through establishing a common ground with the reader
  9. Rhetorical questions
    1. gets the reader to imagine a certain scenario
    2. prods the reader into answering a certain way
    3. lays out common ground or assumptions that the author can build upon
    4. describe certain outcomes that may benefit his argument
  10. Appeal to identity
  11. one that takes advantage of the common values and beliefs of a group
  12. human behaviors that seek belonging
  13. gravitate towards an idea that creates a sense of belonging
  14. Strong directives
  15. using we portrays the reader as being on the same side as the reader
  16. stand in unison
  17. and appeals to sense of belonging
Note about this format:
Devices- I WILL TALK ABT IT MORE LATER BUT IT IS GOOD IF THEY MESH IN TOGETHER YOUR ESSAY WILL SEEM ALMOST MORE PUT TOGETHER
ALSO YOU DON’T ALWAYS WANT TO STICK THE FORMAT FOR THE DEVICES- USE THEM TO GROW AN ARGUMENT AND REALLY BUILD A FOUNDATION
THE FORMAT IS NOT A BE- ALL OR END ALL-YOU CAN CHANGE IT UP
Also strong topic sentences:
Author engages the reader’s interest very early in the article. His use of [element] builds a steady foundation from which he launches his discourse
Without the author’s use of persuasive elements , the article would lose….
How to build strong commentary + get yourself the last points
-This is how I build my sentences- they need to be strong and make sense obviously
explain
The implication is that…
The suggestion is that…
… serves to…
The inclusion of… helps…
… elicits …
… grounds her argument in reality so that even skeptical readers won't be
able to dismiss it
… marks the extent of the problem.
By appealing to our sense of…, the author…
The author exploits the fact that… to…
Given that…, …
… proves to the reader that…
By showing that there is…, the author…
… contributes greatly to the argument's persuasive power by…
Analysis point:
So basically the analysis points are legit Satan’s lap dog because they are hard to get
Here are some tips to guarantee you some amazing success
Example of the thing mentioned above:
This is especially resonant as the author writes this in a climate filled with threats of global warming; the author targets the general American public when he writes this as the administration in power is responsible for opting out of Paris Climate Treaty, and the devastating consequences of such an act along with the rise of natural disasters can only make his argument more persuasive
2nd tip: point out flaws in the author’s argument- this is a hidden trick that always works
I am not talking trash and set on fire the author and the College Board, but you should mention some things regarding a weaker arg and how it could have been stronger so that means LIGHT ACADEMIC TRASHING
Here is an example :
Ok on one of the essays that I took. The guy used a statistic to prove that trees did help reduce temperature. However he used a study from his organization that projected increasing temperature Here is what I said about it: The author through his use of statistics aims to establish a logical choice in the reader's mind. By using numbers from the World Health Organization, he tries to usurp the authority that this organization derives and prove that his choice is not only supported by facts but by experts as well. The use of numbers is particularly significant as well since numbers are often regarded as facts, and thus for someone to argue back, a reader would have to either indict or bring up new evidence. While this use of statistics is effective in this context, the author's use of statistics fails due to a misplaced correlation. In this case, a man's passion reveals his weakness, as he uses a study from his own organization to prove his point, which leads us to a possible reevaluation of the purpose not as something to promote the general well being of urban areas, but as a case of self interest and promotion for his organization. Moreover, the basis of his argument rests upon the fact that temperatures decrease based upon the increase of trees. However throughout the argument, the author fails to establish the correlation of this foundation, and by such weakens his argument. He does, in fact, bring up his study, but his study is only in regards to an estimation of the benefice of planting trees and is based on a misplaced correlation where he assumes correlation.
3rd tip: use transitions and nice words
4th tip: Do you have a weaker paragraph?
5th tip: Always read after each paragraph- like reread- prevents mistakes, and if you need to add more you can!
6th tip: paragraph order
-Topic sentence
-Quote- embed it properly
-Explain effect of the quote on the audience
-Add your spices>>> SPACE or ACADEMIC TRASHING
-Finish with a nice little purpose that explains how it strengthens the argument
7th tip: Try to find a second device
How to practice:
Most people don’t have the time or energy to write an essay everyday
Also this didn’t belong anywhere but here it is:
don't skip a line, indent>>>

some people asked for vocab so here it is
https://blog.collegevine.com/the-50-best-vocab-words-for-the-act-essay/-- strong words
https://blog.prepscholar.com/sat-vocabulary-words- good words to know
https://www.oxford-royale.com/articles/words-phrases-good-essays/#aId=b0308864-2c59-4e78-ae70-668f431523a5 for transitions
https://www.oakland.edu/Assets/upload/docs/OUWC/Presentations&Workshops/Rhetorically-Accurate-Verbs.pdf>>>>> this is for your purpose mostly
https://www.sydney.edu.au/content/dam/students/documents/learning-resources/learning-centre/writing/vocabulary-for-essays.pdf >> this is all you really need honestly
Keep in mind, it is very hard to write and use fancy words in a timed write situation. Please learn the context or at least connotation of these words or else they sound forced. You also don't need fancy word for a good score if you use the sentence pattern you will be fine. The readers are looking for deep analysis if your analysis is trash even if you covered it up with fancy words, it is still trash and you won't earn points. Analysis first and vocab last.
submitted by frenchandsarcastic to Sat [link] [comments]

An introduction to Linux through Windows Subsystem for Linux

I'm working as an Undergraduate Learning Assistant and wrote this guide to help out students who were in the same boat I was in when I first took my university's intro to computer science course. It provides an overview of how to get started using Linux, guides you through setting up Windows Subsystem for Linux to run smoothly on Windows 10, and provides a very basic introduction to Linux. Students seemed to dig it, so I figured it'd help some people in here as well. I've never posted here before, so apologies if I'm unknowingly violating subreddit rules.

An introduction to Linux through Windows Subsystem for Linux

GitHub Pages link

Introduction and motivation

tl;dr skip to next section
So you're thinking of installing a Linux distribution, and are unsure where to start. Or you're an unfortunate soul using Windows 10 in CPSC 201. Either way, this guide is for you. In this section I'll give a very basic intro to some of options you've got at your disposal, and explain why I chose Windows Subsystem for Linux among them. All of these have plenty of documentation online so Google if in doubt.

Setting up WSL

So if you've read this far I've convinced you to use WSL. Let's get started with setting it up. The very basics are outlined in Microsoft's guide here, I'll be covering what they talk about and diving into some other stuff.

1. Installing WSL

Press the Windows key (henceforth Winkey) and type in PowerShell. Right-click the icon and select run as administrator. Next, paste in this command:
dism.exe /online /enable-feature /featurename:Microsoft-Windows-Subsystem-Linux /all /norestart 
Now you'll want to perform a hard shutdown on your computer. This can become unecessarily complicated because of Window's fast startup feature, but here we go. First try pressing the Winkey, clicking on the power icon, and selecting Shut Down while holding down the shift key. Let go of the shift key and the mouse, and let it shutdown. Great! Now open up Command Prompt and type in
wsl --help 
If you get a large text output, WSL has been successfully enabled on your machine. If nothing happens, your computer failed at performing a hard shutdown, in which case you can try the age-old technique of just holding down your computer's power button until the computer turns itself off. Make sure you don't have any unsaved documents open when you do this.

2. Installing Ubuntu

Great! Now that you've got WSL installed, let's download a Linux distro. Press the Winkey and type in Microsoft Store. Now use the store's search icon and type in Ubuntu. Ubuntu is a Debian-based Linux distribution, and seems to have the best integration with WSL, so that's what we'll be going for. If you want to be quirky, here are some other options. Once you type in Ubuntu three options should pop up: Ubuntu, Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, and Ubuntu 18.04 LTS.
![Windows Store](https://theshepord.github.io/intro-to-WSL/docs/images/winstore.png) Installing plain-old "Ubuntu" will mean the app updates whenever a new major Ubuntu distribution is released. The current version (as of 09/02/2020) is Ubuntu 20.04.1 LTS. The other two are older distributions of Ubuntu. For most use-cases, i.e. unless you're running some software that will break when upgrading, you'll want to pick the regular Ubuntu option. That's what I did.
Once that's done installing, again hit Winkey and open up Ubuntu. A console window should open up, asking you to wait a minute or two for files to de-compress and be stored on your PC. All future launches should take less than a second. It'll then prompt you to create a username and password. I'd recommend sticking to whatever your Windows username and password is so that you don't have to juggle around two different usepassword combinations, but up to you.
Finally, to upgrade all your packages, type in
sudo apt-get update 
And then
sudo apt-get upgrade 
apt-get is the Ubuntu package manager, this is what you'll be using to install additional programs on WSL.

3. Making things nice and crispy: an introduction to UNIX-based filesystems

tl;dr skip to the next section
The two above steps are technically all you need for running WSL on your system. However, you may notice that whenever you open up the Ubuntu app your current folder seems to be completely random. If you type in pwd (for Print Working Directory, 'directory' is synonymous with 'folder') inside Ubuntu and hit enter, you'll likely get some output akin to /home/. Where is this folder? Is it my home folder? Type in ls (for LiSt) to see what files are in this folder. Probably you won't get any output, because surprise surprise this folder is not your Windows home folder and is in fact empty (okay it's actually not empty, which we'll see in a bit. If you type in ls -a, a for All, you'll see other files but notice they have a period in front of them. This is a convention for specifying files that should be hidden by default, and ls, as well as most other commands, will honor this convention. Anyways).
So where is my Windows home folder? Is WSL completely separate from Windows? Nope! This is Windows Subsystem for Linux after all. Notice how, when you typed pwd earlier, the address you got was /home/. Notice that forward-slash right before home. That forward-slash indicates the root directory (not to be confused with the /root directory), which is the directory at the top of the directory hierarchy and contains all other directories in your system. So if we type ls /, you'll see what are the top-most directories in your system. Okay, great. They have a bunch of seemingly random names. Except, shocker, they aren't random. I've provided a quick run-down in Appendix A.
For now, though, we'll focus on /mnt, which stands for mount. This is where your C drive, which contains all your Windows stuff, is mounted. So if you type ls /mnt/c, you'll begin to notice some familiar folders. Type in ls /mnt/c/Users, and voilà, there's your Windows home folder. Remember this filepath, /mnt/c/Users/. When we open up Ubuntu, we don't want it tossing us in this random /home/ directory, we want our Windows home folder. Let's change that!

4. Changing your default home folder

Type in sudo vim /etc/passwd. You'll likely be prompted for your Ubuntu's password. sudo is a command that gives you root privileges in bash (akin to Windows's right-click then selecting 'Run as administrator'). vim is a command-line text-editing tool, which out-of-the-box functions kind of like a crummy Notepad (you can customize it infinitely though, and some people have insane vim setups. Appendix B has more info). /etc/passwd is a plaintext file that historically was used to store passwords back when encryption wasn't a big deal, but now instead stores essential user info used every time you open up WSL.
Anyway, once you've typed that in, your shell should look something like this: ![vim /etc/passwd](https://theshepord.github.io/intro-to-WSL/docs/images/vim-etc-passwd.png)
Using arrow-keys, find the entry that begins with your Ubuntu username. It should be towards the bottom of the file. In my case, the line looks like
theshep:x:1000:1000:,,,:/home/pizzatron3000:/bin/bash 
See that cringy, crummy /home/pizzatron3000? Not only do I regret that username to this day, it's also not where we want our home directory. Let's change that! Press i to initiate vim's -- INSERT -- mode. Use arrow-keys to navigate to that section, and delete /home/ by holding down backspace. Remember that filepath I asked you to remember? /mnt/c/Users/. Type that in. For me, the line now looks like
theshep:x:1000:1000:,,,:/mnt/c/Users/lucas:/bin/bash 
Next, press esc to exit insert mode, then type in the following:
:wq 
The : tells vim you're inputting a command, w means write, and q means quit. If you've screwed up any of the above sections, you can also type in :q! to exit vim without saving the file. Just remember to exit insert mode by pressing esc before inputting commands, else you'll instead be writing to the file.
Great! If you now open up a new terminal and type in pwd, you should be in your Window's home folder! However, things seem to be lacking their usual color...

5. Importing your configuration files into the new home directory

Your home folder contains all your Ubuntu and bash configuration files. However, since we just changed the home folder to your Window's home folder, we've lost these configuration files. Let's bring them back! These configuration files are hidden inside /home/, and they all start with a . in front of the filename. So let's copy them over into your new home directory! Type in the following:
cp -r /home//. ~ 
cp stands for CoPy, -r stands for recursive (i.e. descend into directories), the . at the end is cp-specific syntax that lets it copy anything, including hidden files, and the ~ is a quick way of writing your home directory's filepath (which would be /mnt/c/Users/) without having to type all that in again. Once you've run this, all your configuration files should now be present in your new home directory. Configuration files like .bashrc, .profile, and .bash_profile essentially provide commands that are run whenever you open a new shell. So now, if you open a new shell, everything should be working normally. Amazing. We're done!

6. Tips & tricks

Here are two handy commands you can add to your .profile file. Run vim ~/.profile, then, type these in at the top of the .profile file, one per line, using the commands we discussed previously (i to enter insert mode, esc to exit insert mode, :wq to save and quit).
alias rm='rm -i' makes it so that the rm command will always ask for confirmation when you're deleting a file. rm, for ReMove, is like a Windows delete except literally permanent and you will lose that data for good, so it's nice to have this extra safeguard. You can type rm -f to bypass. Linux can be super powerful, but with great power comes great responsibility. NEVER NEVER NEVER type in rm -rf /, this is saying 'delete literally everything and don't ask for confirmation', your computer will die. Newer versions of rm fail when you type this in, but don't push your luck. You've been warned. Be careful.
export DISPLAY=:0 if you install XLaunch VcXsrv, this line allows you to open graphical interfaces through Ubuntu. The export sets the environment variable DISPLAY, and the :0 tells Ubuntu that it should use the localhost display.

Appendix A: brief intro to top-level UNIX directories

tl;dr only mess with /mnt, /home, and maybe maybe /usr. Don't touch anything else.
  • bin: binaries, contains Ubuntu binary (aka executable) files that are used in bash. Here you'll find the binaries that execute commands like ls and pwd. Similar to /usbin, but bin gets loaded earlier in the booting process so it contains the most important commands.
  • boot: contains information for operating system booting. Empty in WSL, because WSL isn't an operating system.
  • dev: devices, provides files that allow Ubuntu to communicate with I/O devices. One useful file here is /dev/null, which is basically an information black hole that automatically deletes any data you pass it.
  • etc: no idea why it's called etc, but it contains system-wide configuration files
  • home: equivalent to Window's C:/Users folder, contains home folders for the different users. In an Ubuntu system, under /home/ you'd find the Documents folder, Downloads folder, etc.
  • lib: libraries used by the system
  • lib64 64-bit libraries used by the system
  • mnt: mount, where your drives are located
  • opt: third-party applications that (usually) don't have any dependencies outside the scope of their own package
  • proc: process information, contains runtime information about your system (e.g. memory, mounted devices, hardware configurations, etc)
  • run: directory for programs to store runtime information.
  • srv: server folder, holds data to be served in protocols like ftp, www, cvs, and others
  • sys: system, provides information about different I/O devices to the Linux Kernel. If dev files allows you to access I/O devices, sys files tells you information about these devices.
  • tmp: temporary, these are system runtime files that are (in most Linux distros) cleared out after every reboot. It's also sort of deprecated for security reasons, and programs will generally prefer to use run.
  • usr: contains additional UNIX commands, header files for compiling C programs, among other things. Kind of like bin but for less important programs. Most of everything you install using apt-get ends up here.
  • var: variable, contains variable data such as logs, databases, e-mail etc, but that persist across different boots.
Also keep in mind that all of this is just convention. No Linux distribution needs to follow this file structure, and in fact almost all will deviate from what I just described. Hell, you could make your own Linux fork where /mnt/c information is stored in tmp.

Appendix B: random resources

EDIT: implemented various changes suggested in the comments. Thanks all!
submitted by HeavenBuilder to linux4noobs [link] [comments]

An excessively detailed guide on how to start shaving, and doing so discretely, based on my personal experience.

Hey dudes and dudettes, I'm an 18-year-old kinda non-binary but mostly just confused male and I recently started shaving my legs and didn't want my parents to know. I thought seeing as though there are always so many questions from people about shaving and doing stuff discretely that I'd go through EVERYTHING of note that I learnt/discovered, so that you can do it too! This is pretty excessively detailed, so I'd recommend reading over it a few times so you get a vibe for what to do and what not to do and then just do it whatever way you figure out to work for you. If anyone has questions, or any other tips they wanna add (or you just wanna point out a spelling mistake), feel free to leave a comment! If it's really personal feel free to DM me but don't DM me your dick or a request for pics, soz.

Stuff you'll NEED:

Stuff that you should really have but isn't essential:

A note

This probably shouldn't be the only thing you look at regarding how to shave. There's a whole bunch of stuff, like exfoliating and stuff like that, which I completely didn't do, which worked for me but might not for you. I'm not an expert, don't get mad at me if I say something technically not perfect. I'm trying to give practical advice to help you peeps out.

the initial clipping

If you're anything like me, your legs will be insanely hairy. You obviously can't just run a razor over hair as long as men's leg hair gets and expect it to shave anything, so you're first going to have to trim it. Girls will suggest you use scissors if your hair is too long, this is ridiculous advice, I think they just don't realise how god damn long men's leg hair is. Scissors work when you have neat little pricks, not when you have a small rainforest. You're gonna want to use something powered, like a beard trimmer, or hair clippers, or a circular saw, or I actually used a trimmer bit thing which is part of the electric razor I use on my face, and although it's small, it did the trick. You can work with what you have here. You're hopefully only going to need to do this bit once or twice, so don't worry too much about damaging the device. Depending on what you're using, you'll probably need to make sure your legs are sufficiently soaked with warm water first. I'm not quite sure if this is necessary at this point but I did it just in case, as the trimmer I used is pretty exposed, so it was cutting pretty close. If you're using something like a hair clipper with a guide on then you probably don't need to do this bit wet but it's better safe than sorry. The point of shaving wet is that it softens your hair slightly and opens your pores and some other things I forget, but if you shave real close while dry then you could get razor burn and similar ailments, which as I'll explain later are a pain in the butt (especially if that's we're you're shaving gotem). Now if you're using something as exposed as the trimmer I used then make sure you don't press too hard. The thing to remember is that electric shavers, and in fact even manual razors if used correctly, are fucking sharp, and they're going to cut whatever comes around, regardless of how much force you put into it. You might need to go over the same bit a few times, but pressing harder isn't going to help you, instead it'll leave behind slightly inflamed red marks for days, which don't hurt that much but they're obviously not good, and can probably get infected or something. You won't really feel when you give yourself one of these, and you'll only notice them come up a few minutes later, so just be careful. Once you're finished, I recommend moisturising just for good measure.
Now, when you're done and you've dried off by patting your legs dry (do not scrub them, pat them, this is how you will always dry your legs from now on), there will be a lot of hair to clean up. Like so much fucking hair. There'll be hair on the floor and the walls and the shower screen and fucking everywhere. To clean up the bulk of it will take like ten minutes on its own, but if like me you're a bit paranoid and don't want your parents to find out, I would say it'd take like 30 minutes or more, so I'd make sure you have about an hour of time to clean up. Also, something which I didn't consider until after doing it is that running a hot shower will leave condensation on the mirror and everything and make it obvious that you showered, so while it's not that conspicuous, you might wanna also have that hour buffer to let that all go away so that they don't pick up on the fact that you're having a shower whenever you're alone (or in my case going against my normal schedule of having a shower at night). You can also wipe the bathroom mirror or whatevs with a towel if you're worried but make sure it's not a towel you mopped your hair up with like the one my idiot ass used.
Anyway, after you've trimmed, you'll probably (read: definitely) have missed a few spots. It's hard to see if you've missed a bit when you're dealing with so much hair and it's all wet and sticking to your body. I would dry off and wait a day or so, checking your legs out for missed spots, then go again. Eventually you'll have prickly cactus legs but they're manageable, and it's a base that you can use a razor with.
If you have limited alone time and you don't have any discrete way of shaving (e.g. by using a manual non-electric razor in your normal showers) then you can leave your legs just trimmed as they are for a while (a week and a bit, I would think) before you go back in the danger zone and do the next step, so feel free to take a break here.

actually shaving

Oh hell yeah we're up to actually shaving. You'll need any razor. Literally any. Men's, women's, manual, electric, whatever, it'll work great. I personally would recommend going for something not powered which therefore doesn't make noise, as you can then shave in your normal showers without outing yourself. Also as I mentioned before, many women prefer to use men's razors so don't worry. If you want, just use the thing you use on your face, cause that's the least suspicious thing to do. I actually went a bit cheeky and used my Mum's at first before quickly buying my own Gillette Fusion5 ProGlide (men's razor so wasn't very intimidating to buy), which seems to do pretty darn well.
Anyway so get in a warm shower. You're meant to leave it for like 15 minutes to get an absolutely perfect shave, but you can get perfect over time, for now just make sure you're decently warm before you start shaving. If you have it, you should put shaving cream on your legs now (or conditioner apparently works pretty well too so that's actually what I used initially EDIT:, but I found that it wasn't quite enough and I still ended up with the red spots of doom, so maybe try something a bit better). It doesn't matter too much seeing as though you're already wet and warm, but it'll make your razor's job easier and depending on what you use it'll make your job easier by showing you where you've already done. It'll also reduce the risk of irritating your pores and blah blah.
Start at your ankles and work going against the grain in short, 6cmish (2 and a bit inches I think) strokes, applying basically no pressure. If you get a huge amount of irritation after this then try going with the grain next time, but going against it is obviously more convenient to do standing in the shower, and will give a closer shave. I recommend working in a circle around the circumference of your leg and then moving up a bit but do whatever works. Over time you'll develop a less robotic technique, but this is a great way to start. I know some girls that do big strokes all the way from their ankles up to their thighs and while that might work with more consistently shaved hair, you probably can't do it on your first shave. Definitely try to overlap slightly, like as you go up the leg start your strokes lower than where you're up to so that half of each stroke is covering the area you've already shaved or something like that. It's pretty hard to see hairs when you're in a shower and bending over awkwardly to reach your legs so try and keep track. I find that feeling for prickly areas is the best way to find where you've missed. Your knees and ankles will be the easiest areas to cut yourself on so watch out with them. Don't forget to do the back of your legs, especially the inner of your knee. Other easy spots to miss include your knees, inner thighs, and if you're a bit lean like myself, the valley between the bone and back muscle on the inside edge of your shins (hard to explain but you'll get it if you get it). There's nothing wrong with taking it slow so take as long as you need. Once you've done both legs, apply moisturiser (if you wanna be extra good then apply one which you can put on dry after you've gotten out of the shower). EDIT: there's no such thing as too much moisturiser, and if you start having issues like red dots and shit then not moisturising properly is a decent culprit. END EDIT. When you dry your legs remember to just pat them down.
After shaving you'll find a few things. One is that you probably will have gotten a bit too eager and cut yourself in a few places. It won't hurt, and you probably won't notice until a while after you've done it or even not until you're out of the shower, but holy shit some areas will bleed like mad. I got a cut on my knee that just pissed blood for like 45 minutes. Now, you could bandaid these areas, and that's not a bad idea, but I was worried that would lead to scabbing, so I lightly patted the blood off of them every now and again. You'll adjust to the ideal force and cutting angle over time, so don't worry, cuts will become rare. For me it took about three shaves to get to something decent, the first time I over-did it and cut myself a heap, the second time I under-did it and ended up doing effectively nothing, and the third time I got it just about right, and then I upgraded razor and cut myself again oops. I think it's one of those things where your brain adjusts over time without you even thinking about it.
Anyway, as well as cutting yourself, you'll likely find that you've missed a bunch of areas. For me I found that some areas, like on my shins and around my ankles, there were like about half a dozen scattered hairs which the razor missed in an otherwise smooth area. These I found easy to just pluck out with a pair of tweezers. This sounds like it'd be painful, but weirdly I found that especially after a warm shower, it didn't really hurt at all, and I could actually remove hairs by pulling really slowly and they came out with almost no pain. I also used this on the few little hairs that have grown on my feet. This might be different for your hair though so YMMV. There'll be other areas where there are a lot of quite long hairs, and for these areas you can choose whether you cut them with scissors or whatever or run over them again with whatever powered thing you used for the initial shave.
Finally, if you're like me, you won't get as happy about having shaved legs as you'd think you would. I found that while I didn't get super gushy about them after the initial few minutes, I found that looking at them made me go "yep those are my legs" instead of making me feel uncomfortable or as though they were ugly or didn't belong to me. I definitely don't regret it, it's just I'm not ecstatically euphoric, just no longer dysphoric (which I guess counts as being euphoric but whatever). I also found that it made me want more (or less, in terms of hair). I spent a touch over half an hour manually tending to the hair on my feet using the tweezers and scissors of a Swiss Army Knife, but then I looked at myself naked and realised that I also wanted to shave my butt and dick hair, which is a separate exercise I haven't gotten to yet (although I'm probably just going to repeat a similar process to what I suggested here albeit a bit more gingerly around my privates). The fact is though that I feel better about myself, and that's great. The big bit for me is done; the part of my bottom half that people will see now represents me in the way that I want it to. But now it's more about how I want to see myself, and that's kind of comforting in a way, cause it shows I'm not faking this shit for attention or anything.
Anyway yeah, now just shave your legs with a razor every now and then and you'll be good! Don't shave every day, at absolute most shave every second day. Try and leave it for a few days though if you can. I definitely shaved every second day for a little bit when I first started just so I could hone in on the little missed spots and stuff like that, but once you get going don't feel like you have to have ultra smooth legs every second of every day. Even if you go around wearing shorts/a skirt every day people probably won't notice two or three days of stubble unless they get creepily close for strangers. And if they're your friends and they're complaining about three day stubble then you should probably try and get better friends especially considering how big of a deal it is to do this stuff in the first place as men. Just remember that you're looking way closer than anyone else is going to, so if you can see lots of tiny little black stubbly dots then that doesn't mean other people are going to. It doesn't always need to be as close a shave as your face cause people get way closer to your face than your legs. I think some people on this sub need to realise that they don't need to be 100% perfect with everything to look 100% perfect.
Anyway yeah that's my immensely detailed guide to shaving your legs as a man living at home. Hope it helps some people.
EDIT:
If you get red spots of badness, here are some suggestions. Also if you wanna be real careful, do these things regardless, at worst it'll be a better shave. - start using shaving cream if you aren't already - use better moisturiser if you're using something a bit dodge for moisturising. - exfoliate your legs before shaving them, this means get a loofah/facewasher and shove some soap on and then scrub your legs.
And if that still doesn't work then here are some more inconvenient methods that might work - moisturise your legs regularly - shave with the grain instead of against the grain (this won't be as close a shave but it's better for avoiding ingrown hairs)
In the case you do get the horrible rednesses, moisturise moisturise moisturise. It'll make it sting less, it'll make it look better, and it'll reduce the potential damage. I recommend doing it after drying off at the end of an unsuccesful shave in the shower but any time is a good time.
A further edit:
You might be wondering about other options, like waxing, using an epilator, and hair removal cream. While these are all great options which could get you a far better shave which lasts longer and is easier to do, there are a couple of problems to consider. First off, none of the methods I just listed are easy to do in secret. By contrast, not only is owning a razor is a perfectly normal thing for a man, you probably already have everything you need in your house, and even if you are hiding everything to do with it, it won't take up much space or be particularly conspicuous, because even the creams associated with shaving are used for a vast variety of non-gendered purposes. Also, shaving with a manual razor is basically silent in the shower, and you can easily ditch half-way through a shave. Shaving is also relatively speaking very quick, it obviously will add a bit of time to your showers, but it's not like an hour long process. Another good thing about shaving is that it's basically the default, and most women either shave or have shaved in the past, so you can easily find advice online or ask your girl friends if you need a hand. It's also fairly affordable, even if it isn't the cheapest option out there.
You have options, definitely, but I personally think that shaving is the most realistic hair removal option to do discretely, and that arguably outweighs the difficulty and occasional frustration that comes with it.
submitted by ThatBrandThrowaway to feminineboys [link] [comments]

First Time Going Through Coding Interviews?

This post draws on my personal experiences and challenges over the past term at school, which I entered with hardly any knowledge of DSA (data structures and algorithms) and problem-solving strategies. As a self-taught programmer, I was a lot more familiar and comfortable with general programming, such as object-oriented programming, than with the problem-solving skills required in DSA questions.
This post reflects my journey throughout the term and the resources I turned to in order to quickly improve for my coding interview.
Here're some common questions and answers
What's the interview process like at a tech company?
Good question. It's actually pretty different from most other companies.

(What It's Like To Interview For A Coding Job

First time interviewing for a tech job? Not sure what to expect? This article is for you.

Here are the usual steps:

  1. First, you’ll do a non-technical phone screen.
  2. Then, you’ll do one or a few technical phone interviews.
  3. Finally, the last step is an onsite interview.
Some companies also throw in a take-home code test—sometimes before the technical phone interviews, sometimes after.
Let’s walk through each of these steps.

The non-technical phone screen

This first step is a quick call with a recruiter—usually just 10–20 minutes. It's very casual.
Don’t expect technical questions. The recruiter probably won’t be a programmer.
The main goal is to gather info about your job search. Stuff like:

  1. Your timeline. Do you need to sign an offer in the next week? Or are you trying to start your new job in three months?
  2. What’s most important to you in your next job. Great team? Flexible hours? Interesting technical challenges? Room to grow into a more senior role?
  3. What stuff you’re most interested in working on. Front end? Back end? Machine learning?
Be honest about all this stuff—that’ll make it easier for the recruiter to get you what you want.
One exception to that rule: If the recruiter asks you about your salary expectations on this call, best not to answer. Just say you’d rather talk about compensation after figuring out if you and the company are a good fit. This’ll put you in a better negotiating position later on.

The technical phone interview(s)

The next step is usually one or more hour-long technical phone interviews.
Your interviewer will call you on the phone or tell you to join them on Skype or Google Hangouts. Make sure you can take the interview in a quiet place with a great internet connection. Consider grabbing a set of headphones with a good microphone or a bluetooth earpiece. Always test your hardware beforehand!
The interviewer will want to watch you code in real time. Usually that means using a web-based code editor like Coderpad or collabedit. Run some practice problems in these tools ahead of time, to get used to them. Some companies will just ask you to share your screen through Google Hangouts or Skype.
Turn off notifications on your computer before you get started—especially if you’re sharing your screen!
Technical phone interviews usually have three parts:

  1. Beginning chitchat (5–10 minutes)
  2. Technical challenges (30–50 minutes)
  3. Your turn to ask questions (5–10 minutes)
The beginning chitchat is half just to help your relax, and half actually part of the interview. The interviewer might ask some open-ended questions like:

  1. Tell me about yourself.
  2. Tell me about something you’ve built that you’re particularly proud of.
  3. I see this project listed on your resume—tell me more about that.
You should be able to talk at length about the major projects listed on your resume. What went well? What didn’t? How would you do things differently now?
Then come the technical challenges—the real meet of the interview. You’ll spend most of the interview on this. You might get one long question, or several shorter ones.
What kind of questions can you expect? It depends.
Startups tend to ask questions aimed towards building or debugging code. (“Write a function that takes two rectangles and figures out if they overlap.”). They’ll care more about progress than perfection.
Larger companies will want to test your general know-how of data structures and algorithms (“Write a function that checks if a binary tree is ‘balanced’ in O(n)O(n) ↴ time.”). They’ll care more about how you solve and optimize a problem.
With these types of questions, the most important thing is to be communicating with your interviewer throughout. You'll want to "think out loud" as you work through the problem. For more info, check out our more detailed step-by-step tips for coding interviews.
If the role requires specific languages or frameworks, some companies will ask trivia-like questions (“In Python, what’s the ‘global interpreter lock’?”).
After the technical questions, your interviewer will open the floor for you to ask them questions. Take some time before the interview to comb through the company’s website. Think of a few specific questions about the company or the role. This can really make you stand out.
When you’re done, they should give you a timeframe on when you’ll hear about next steps. If all went well, you’ll either get asked to do another phone interview, or you’ll be invited to their offices for an onsite.

The onsite interview

An onsite interview happens in person, at the company’s office. If you’re not local, it’s common for companies to pay for a flight and hotel room for you.
The onsite usually consists of 2–6 individual, one-on-one technical interviews (usually in a small conference room). Each interview will be about an hour and have the same basic form as a phone screen—technical questions, bookended by some chitchat at the beginning and a chance for you to ask questions at the end.
The major difference between onsite technical interviews and phone interviews though: you’ll be coding on a whiteboard.
This is awkward at first. No autocomplete, no debugging tools, no delete button…ugh. The good news is, after some practice you get used to it. Before your onsite, practice writing code on a whiteboard (in a pinch, a pencil and paper are fine). Some tips:

  1. Start in the top-most left corner of the whiteboard. This gives you the most room. You’ll need more space than you think.
  2. Leave a blank line between each line as you write your code. Makes it much easier to add things in later.
  3. Take an extra second to decide on your variable names. Don’t rush this part. It might seem like a waste of time, but using more descriptive variable names ultimately saves you time because it makes you less likely to get confused as you write the rest of your code.
If a technical phone interview is a sprint, an onsite is a marathon. The day can get really long. Best to keep it open—don’t make other plans for the afternoon or evening.
When things go well, you’ wrap-up by chatting with the CEO or some other director. This is half an interview, half the company trying to impress you. They may invite you to get drinks with the team after hours.
All told, a long day of onsite interviews could look something like this:

If they let you go after just a couple interviews, it’s usually a sign that they’re going to pass on you. That’s okay—it happens!
There are are a lot of easy things you can do the day before and morning of your interview to put yourself in the best possible mindset. Check out our piece on what to do in the 24 hours before your onsite coding interview.

The take-home code test

Code tests aren’t ubiquitous, but they seem to be gaining in popularity. They’re far more common at startups, or places where your ability to deliver right away is more important than your ability to grow.
You’ll receive a description of an app or service, a rough time constraint for writing your code, and a deadline for when to turn it in. The deadline is usually negotiable.
Here's an example problem:
Write a basic “To-Do” app. Unit test the core functionality. As a bonus, add a “reminders” feature. Try to spend no more than 8 hours on it, and send in what you have by Friday with a small write-up.
Take a crack at the “bonus” features if they include any. At the very least, write up how you would implement it.
If they’re hiring for people with knowledge of a particular framework, they might tell you what tech to use. Otherwise, it’ll be up to you. Use what you’re most comfortable with. You want this code to show you at your best.
Some places will offer to pay you for your time. It's rare, but some places will even invite you to work with them in their office for a few days, as a "trial.")
Do I need to know this "big O" stuff?
Big O notation is the language we use for talking about the efficiency of data structures and algorithms.
Will it come up in your interviews? Well, it depends. There are different types of interviews.
There’s the classic algorithmic coding interview, sometimes called the “Google-style whiteboard interview.” It’s focused on data structures and algorithms (queues and stacks, binary search, etc).
That’s what our full course prepares you for. It's how the big players interview. Google, Facebook, Amazon, Microsoft, Oracle, LinkedIn, etc.
For startups and smaller shops, it’s a mixed bag. Most will ask at least a few algorithmic questions. But they might also include some role-specific stuff, like Java questions or SQL questions for a backend web engineer. They’ll be especially interested in your ability to ship code without much direction. You might end up doing a code test or pair-programming exercise instead of a whiteboarding session.
To make sure you study for the right stuff, you should ask your recruiter what to expect. Send an email with a question like, “Is this interview going to cover data structures and algorithms? Or will it be more focused around coding in X language.” They’ll be happy to tell you.
If you've never learned about data structures and algorithms, or you're feeling a little rusty, check out our Intuitive Guide to Data Structures and Algorithms.
Which programming language should I use?
Companies usually let you choose, in which case you should use your most comfortable language. If you know a bunch of languages, prefer one that lets you express more with fewer characters and fewer lines of code, like Python or Ruby. It keeps your whiteboard cleaner.
Try to stick with the same language for the whole interview, but sometimes you might want to switch languages for a question. E.g., processing a file line by line will be far easier in Python than in C++.
Sometimes, though, your interviewer will do this thing where they have a pet question that’s, for example, C-specific. If you list C on your resume, they’ll ask it.
So keep that in mind! If you’re not confident with a language, make that clear on your resume. Put your less-strong languages under a header like ‘Working Knowledge.’
What should I wear?
A good rule of thumb is to dress a tiny step above what people normally wear to the office. For most west coast tech companies, the standard digs are just jeans and a t-shirt. Ask your recruiter what the office is like if you’re worried about being too casual.
Should I send a thank-you note?
Thank-you notes are nice, but they aren’t really expected. Be casual if you send one. No need for a hand-calligraphed note on fancy stationery. Opt for a short email to your recruiter or the hiring manager. Thank them for helping you through the process, and ask them to relay your thanks to your interviewers.
1) Coding Interview Tips
How to get better at technical interviews without practicing
Chitchat like a pro.
Before diving into code, most interviewers like to chitchat about your background. They're looking for:

You should have at least one:

Nerd out about stuff. Show you're proud of what you've done, you're amped about what they're doing, and you have opinions about languages and workflows.
Communicate.
Once you get into the coding questions, communication is key. A candidate who needed some help along the way but communicated clearly can be even better than a candidate who breezed through the question.
Understand what kind of problem it is. There are two types of problems:

  1. Coding. The interviewer wants to see you write clean, efficient code for a problem.
  2. Chitchat. The interviewer just wants you to talk about something. These questions are often either (1) high-level system design ("How would you build a Twitter clone?") or (2) trivia ("What is hoisting in Javascript?"). Sometimes the trivia is a lead-in for a "real" question e.g., "How quickly can we sort a list of integers? Good, now suppose instead of integers we had . . ."
If you start writing code and the interviewer just wanted a quick chitchat answer before moving on to the "real" question, they'll get frustrated. Just ask, "Should we write code for this?"
Make it feel like you're on a team. The interviewer wants to know what it feels like to work through a problem with you, so make the interview feel collaborative. Use "we" instead of "I," as in, "If we did a breadth-first search we'd get an answer in O(n)O(n) time." If you get to choose between coding on paper and coding on a whiteboard, always choose the whiteboard. That way you'll be situated next to the interviewer, facing the problem (rather than across from her at a table).
Think out loud. Seriously. Say, "Let's try doing it this way—not sure yet if it'll work." If you're stuck, just say what you're thinking. Say what might work. Say what you thought could work and why it doesn't work. This also goes for trivial chitchat questions. When asked to explain Javascript closures, "It's something to do with scope and putting stuff in a function" will probably get you 90% credit.
Say you don't know. If you're touching on a fact (e.g., language-specific trivia, a hairy bit of runtime analysis), don't try to appear to know something you don't. Instead, say "I'm not sure, but I'd guess $thing, because...". The because can involve ruling out other options by showing they have nonsensical implications, or pulling examples from other languages or other problems.
Slow the eff down. Don't confidently blurt out an answer right away. If it's right you'll still have to explain it, and if it's wrong you'll seem reckless. You don't win anything for speed and you're more likely to annoy your interviewer by cutting her off or appearing to jump to conclusions.
Get unstuck.
Sometimes you'll get stuck. Relax. It doesn't mean you've failed. Keep in mind that the interviewer usually cares more about your ability to cleverly poke the problem from a few different angles than your ability to stumble into the correct answer. When hope seems lost, keep poking.
Draw pictures. Don't waste time trying to think in your head—think on the board. Draw a couple different test inputs. Draw how you would get the desired output by hand. Then think about translating your approach into code.
Solve a simpler version of the problem. Not sure how to find the 4th largest item in the set? Think about how to find the 1st largest item and see if you can adapt that approach.
Write a naive, inefficient solution and optimize it later. Use brute force. Do whatever it takes to get some kind of answer.
Think out loud more. Say what you know. Say what you thought might work and why it won't work. You might realize it actually does work, or a modified version does. Or you might get a hint.
Wait for a hint. Don't stare at your interviewer expectantly, but do take a brief second to "think"—your interviewer might have already decided to give you a hint and is just waiting to avoid interrupting.
Think about the bounds on space and runtime. If you're not sure if you can optimize your solution, think about it out loud. For example:

Get your thoughts down.
It's easy to trip over yourself. Focus on getting your thoughts down first and worry about the details at the end.
Call a helper function and keep moving. If you can't immediately think of how to implement some part of your algorithm, big or small, just skip over it. Write a call to a reasonably-named helper function, say "this will do X" and keep going. If the helper function is trivial, you might even get away with never implementing it.
Don't worry about syntax. Just breeze through it. Revert to English if you have to. Just say you'll get back to it.
Leave yourself plenty of room. You may need to add code or notes in between lines later. Start at the top of the board and leave a blank line between each line.
Save off-by-one checking for the end. Don't worry about whether your for loop should have "<<" or "<=<=." Write a checkmark to remind yourself to check it at the end. Just get the general algorithm down.
Use descriptive variable names. This will take time, but it will prevent you from losing track of what your code is doing. Use names_to_phone_numbers instead of nums. Imply the type in the name. Functions returning booleans should start with "is_*". Vars that hold a list should end with "s." Choose standards that make sense to you and stick with them.
Clean up when you're done.
Walk through your solution by hand, out loud, with an example input. Actually write down what values the variables hold as the program is running—you don't win any brownie points for doing it in your head. This'll help you find bugs and clear up confusion your interviewer might have about what you're doing.
Look for off-by-one errors. Should your for loop use a "<=<=" instead of a "<<"?
Test edge cases. These might include empty sets, single-item sets, or negative numbers. Bonus: mention unit tests!
Don't be boring. Some interviewers won't care about these cleanup steps. If you're unsure, say something like, "Then I'd usually check the code against some edge cases—should we do that next?"
Practice.
In the end, there's no substitute for running practice questions.
Actually write code with pen and paper. Be honest with yourself. It'll probably feel awkward at first. Good. You want to get over that awkwardness now so you're not fumbling when it's time for the real interview.

2) Tricks For Getting Unstuck During a Coding Interview
Getting stuck during a coding interview is rough.
If you weren’t in an interview, you might take a break or ask Google for help. But the clock is ticking, and you don’t have Google.
You just have an empty whiteboard, a smelly marker, and an interviewer who’s looking at you expectantly. And all you can think about is how stuck you are.
You need a lifeline for these moments—like a little box that says “In Case of Emergency, Break Glass.”
Inside that glass box? A list of tricks for getting unstuck. Here’s that list of tricks.
When you’re stuck on getting started
1) Write a sample input on the whiteboard and turn it into the correct output "by hand." Notice the process you use. Look for patterns, and think about how to implement your process in code.
Trying to reverse a string? Write “hello” on the board. Reverse it “by hand”—draw arrows from each character’s current position to its desired position.
Notice the pattern: it looks like we’re swapping pairs of characters, starting from the outside and moving in. Now we’re halfway to an algorithm.
2) Solve a simpler version of the problem. Remove or simplify one of the requirements of the problem. Once you have a solution, see if you can adapt that approach for the original question.
Trying to find the k-largest element in a set? Walk through finding the largest element, then the second largest, then the third largest. Generalizing from there to find the k-largest isn’t so bad.
3) Start with an inefficient solution. Even if it feels stupidly inefficient, it’s often helpful to start with something that’ll return the right answer. From there, you just have to optimize your solution. Explain to your interviewer that this is only your first idea, and that you suspect there are faster solutions.
Suppose you were given two lists of sorted numbers and asked to find the median of both lists combined. It’s messy, but you could simply:

  1. Concatenate the arrays together into a new array.
  2. Sort the new array.
  3. Return the value at the middle index.
Notice that you could’ve also arrived at this algorithm by using trick (2): Solve a simpler version of the problem. “How would I find the median of one sorted list of numbers? Just grab the item at the middle index. Now, can I adapt that approach for getting the median of two sorted lists?”
When you’re stuck on finding optimizations
1) Look for repeat work. If your current solution goes through the same data multiple times, you’re doing unnecessary repeat work. See if you can save time by looking through the data just once.
Say that inside one of your loops, there’s a brute-force operation to find an element in an array. You’re repeatedly looking through items that you don’t have to. Instead, you could convert the array to a lookup table to dramatically improve your runtime.
2) Look for hints in the specifics of the problem. Is the input array sorted? Is the binary tree balanced? Details like this can carry huge hints about the solution. If it didn’t matter, your interviewer wouldn’t have brought it up. It’s a strong sign that the best solution to the problem exploits it.
Suppose you’re asked to find the first occurrence of a number in a sorted array. The fact that the array is sorted is a strong hint—take advantage of that fact by using a binary search.

Sometimes interviewers leave the question deliberately vague because they want you to ask questions to unearth these important tidbits of context. So ask some questions at the beginning of the problem.
3) Throw some data structures at the problem. Can you save time by using the fast lookups of a hash table? Can you express the relationships between data points as a graph? Look at the requirements of the problem and ask yourself if there’s a data structure that has those properties.
4) Establish bounds on space and runtime. Think out loud about the parameters of the problem. Try to get a sense for how fast your algorithm could possibly be:

When All Else Fails
1) Make it clear where you are. State what you know, what you’re trying to do, and highlight the gap between the two. The clearer you are in expressing exactly where you’re stuck, the easier it is for your interviewer to help you.
2) Pay attention to your interviewer. If she asks a question about something you just said, there’s probably a hint buried in there. Don’t worry about losing your train of thought—drop what you’re doing and dig into her question.
Relax. You’re supposed to get stuck.
Interviewers choose hard problems on purpose. They want to see how you poke at a problem you don’t immediately know how to solve.
Seriously. If you don’t get stuck and just breeze through the problem, your interviewer’s evaluation might just say “Didn’t get a good read on candidate’s problem-solving process—maybe she’d already seen this interview question before?”
On the other hand, if you do get stuck, use one of these tricks to get unstuck, and communicate clearly with your interviewer throughout...that’s how you get an evaluation like, “Great problem-solving skills. Hire.”

3) Fixing Impostor Syndrome in Coding Interviews
“It's a fluke that I got this job interview...”
“I studied for weeks, but I’m still not prepared...”
“I’m not actually good at this. They’re going to see right through me...”
If any of these thoughts resonate with you, you're not alone. They are so common they have a name: impostor syndrome.
It’s that feeling like you’re on the verge of being exposed for what you really are—an impostor. A fraud.
Impostor syndrome is like kryptonite to coding interviews. It makes you give up and go silent.
You might stop asking clarifying questions because you’re afraid they’ll sound too basic. Or you might neglect to think out loud at the whiteboard, fearing you’ll say something wrong and sound incompetent.
You know you should speak up, but the fear of looking like an impostor makes that really, really hard.
Here’s the good news: you’re not an impostor. You just feel like an impostor because of some common cognitive biases about learning and knowledge.
Once you understand these cognitive biases—where they come from and how they work—you can slowly fix them. You can quiet your worries about being an impostor and keep those negative thoughts from affecting your interviews.

Everything you could know

Here’s how impostor syndrome works.
Software engineering is a massive field. There’s a huge universe of things you could know. Huge.
In comparison to the vast world of things you could know, the stuff you actually know is just a tiny sliver:
That’s the first problem. It feels like you don’t really know that much, because you only know a tiny sliver of all the stuff there is to know.

The expanding universe

It gets worse: counterintuitively, as you learn more, your sliver of knowledge feels like it's shrinking.
That's because you brush up against more and more things you don’t know yet. Whole disciplines like machine learning, theory of computation, and embedded systems. Things you can't just pick up in an afternoon. Heavy bodies of knowledge that take months to understand.
So the universe of things you could know seems to keep expanding faster and faster—much faster than your tiny sliver of knowledge is growing. It feels like you'll never be able to keep up.

What everyone else knows

Here's another common cognitive bias: we assume that because something is easy for us, it must be easy for everyone else. So when we look at our own skills, we assume they're not unique. But when we look at other people's skills, we notice the skills they have that we don't have.
The result? We think everyone’s knowledge is a superset of our own:
This makes us feel like everyone else is ahead of us. Like we're always a step behind.
But the truth is more like this:
There's a whole area of stuff you know that neither Aysha nor Bruno knows. An area you're probably blind to, because you're so focused on the stuff you don't know.

We’ve all had flashes of realizing this. For me, it was seeing the back end code wizard on my team—the one that always made me feel like an impostor—spend an hour trying to center an image on a webpage.

It's a problem of focus

Focusing on what you don't know causes you to underestimate what you do know. And that's what causes impostor syndrome.
By looking at the vast (and expanding) universe of things you could know, you feel like you hardly know anything.
And by looking at what Aysha and Bruno know that you don't know, you feel like you're a step behind.
And interviews make you really focus on what you don't know. You focus on what could go wrong. The knowledge gaps your interviewers might find. The questions you might not know how to answer.
But remember:
Just because Aysha and Bruno know some things you don't know, doesn't mean you don't also know things Aysha and Bruno don't know.
And more importantly, everyone's body of knowledge is just a teeny-tiny sliver of everything they could learn. We all have gaps in our knowledge. We all have interview questions we won't be able to answer.
You're not a step behind. You just have a lot of stuff you don't know yet. Just like everyone else.

4) The 24 Hours Before Your Interview

Feeling anxious? That’s normal. Your body is telling you you’re about to do something that matters.

The twenty-four hours before your onsite are about finding ways to maximize your performance. Ideally, you wanna be having one of those days, where elegant code flows effortlessly from your fingertips, and bugs dare not speak your name for fear you'll squash them.
You need to get your mind and body in The Zone™ before you interview, and we've got some simple suggestions to help.
5) Why You're Hitting Dead Ends In Whiteboard Interviews

The coding interview is like a maze

Listening vs. holding your train of thought

Finally! After a while of shooting in the dark and frantically fiddling with sample inputs on the whiteboard, you've came up with an algorithm for solving the coding question your interviewer gave you.
Whew. Such a relief to have a clear path forward. To not be flailing anymore.
Now you're cruising, getting ready to code up your solution.
When suddenly, your interviewer throws you a curve ball.
"What if we thought of the problem this way?"
You feel a tension we've all felt during the coding interview:
"Try to listen to what they're saying...but don't lose your train of thought...ugh, I can't do both!"
This is a make-or-break moment in the coding interview. And so many people get it wrong.
Most candidates end up only half understanding what their interviewer is saying. Because they're only half listening. Because they're desperately clinging to their train of thought.
And it's easy to see why. For many of us, completely losing track of what we're doing is one of our biggest coding interview fears. So we devote half of our mental energy to clinging to our train of thought.
To understand why that's so wrong, we need to understand the difference between what we see during the coding interview and what our interviewer sees.

The programming interview maze

Working on a coding interview question is like walking through a giant maze.
You don't know anything about the shape of the maze until you start wandering around it. You might know vaguely where the solution is, but you don't know how to get there.
As you wander through the maze, you might find a promising path (an approach, a way to break down the problem). You might follow that path for a bit.
Suddenly, your interviewer suggests a different path:
But from what you can see so far of the maze, your approach has already gotten you halfway there! Losing your place on your current path would mean a huge step backwards. Or so it seems.
That's why people hold onto their train of thought instead of listening to their interviewer. Because from what they can see, it looks like they're getting somewhere!
But here's the thing: your interviewer knows the whole maze. They've asked this question 100 times.

I'm not exaggerating: if you interview candidates for a year, you can easily end up asking the same question over 100 times.
So if your interviewer is suggesting a certain path, you can bet it leads to an answer.
And your seemingly great path? There's probably a dead end just ahead that you haven't seen yet:
Or it could just be a much longer route to a solution than you think it is. That actually happens pretty often—there's an answer there, but it's more complicated than you think.

Hitting a dead end is okay. Failing to listen is not.

Your interviewer probably won't fault you for going down the wrong path at first. They've seen really smart engineers do the same thing. They understand it's because you only have a partial view of the maze.
They might have let you go down the wrong path for a bit to see if you could keep your thinking organized without help. But now they want to rush you through the part where you discover the dead end and double back. Not because they don't believe you can manage it yourself. But because they want to make sure you have enough time to finish the question.
But here's something they will fault you for: failing to listen to them. Nobody wants to work with an engineer who doesn't listen.
So when you find yourself in that crucial coding interview moment, when you're torn between holding your train of thought and considering the idea your interviewer is suggesting...remember this:
Listening to your interviewer is the most important thing.
Take what they're saying and run with it. Think of the next steps that follow from what they're saying.
Even if it means completely leaving behind the path you were on. Trust the route your interviewer is pointing you down.
Because they can see the whole maze.
6) How To Get The Most Out Of Your Coding Interview Practice Sessions
When you start practicing for coding interviews, there’s a lot to cover. You’ll naturally wanna brush up on technical questions. But how you practice those questions will make a big difference in how well you’re prepared.
Here’re a few tips to make sure you get the most out of your practice sessions.
Track your weak spots
One of the hardest parts of practicing is knowing what to practice. Tracking what you struggle with helps answer that question.
So grab a fresh notebook. After each question, look back and ask yourself, “What did I get wrong about this problem at first?” Take the time to write down one or two things you got stuck on, and what helped you figure them out. Compare these notes to our tips for getting unstuck.
After each full practice session, read through your entire running list. Read it at the beginning of each practice session too. This’ll add a nice layer of rigor to your practice, so you’re really internalizing the lessons you’re learning.
Use an actual whiteboard
Coding on a whiteboard is awkward at first. You have to write out every single character, and you can’t easily insert or delete blocks of code.
Use your practice sessions to iron out that awkwardness. Run a few problems on a piece of paper or, if you can, a real whiteboard. A few helpful tips for handwriting code:

Set a timer
Get a feel for the time pressure of an actual interview. You should be able to finish a problem in 30–45 minutes, including debugging your code at the end.
If you’re just starting out and the timer adds too much stress, put this technique on the shelf. Add it in later as you start to get more comfortable with solving problems.
Think out loud
Like writing code on a whiteboard, this is an acquired skill. It feels awkward at first. But your interviewer will expect you to think out loud during the interview, so you gotta power through that awkwardness.
A good trick to get used to talking out loud: Grab a buddy. Another engineer would be great, but you can also do this with a non-technical friend.
Have your buddy sit in while you talk through a problem. Better yet—try loading up one of our questions on an iPad and giving that to your buddy to use as a script!
Set aside a specific time of day to practice.
Give yourself an hour each day to practice. Commit to practicing around the same time, like after you eat dinner. This helps you form a stickier habit of practicing.
Prefer small, daily doses of practice to doing big cram sessions every once in a while. Distributing your practice sessions helps you learn more with less time and effort in the long run.
part -2 will be upcoming in another post !
submitted by Cyberrockz to u/Cyberrockz [link] [comments]

In-depth Review of Yandere Simulator Part 2: All the elimination methods

Hello Osana once more. A while ago I made a review of my first impressions on the Osana demo, which you can read over here: https://www.reddit.com/Osana/comments/ikcxc4/first_impressions_indepth_review_of_yandere/?utm_source=share&utm_medium=web2x&context=3
As you can see, my first time playing the game… wasn't that positive. I found many bugs and a lot of glaring issues about the game's design, and at the end I came to the conclusion that Yandere Simulator is far from being 91% complete. A lot of its current features need to be reworked, rebalanced, and improved, a lot of new features are needed, and if we add to this all the rival-specific elimination methods and the multiple endings planned, it's hard to see this game being anywhere close to finished. It is still a very amateurish product, and I hope those working on it can see that and making the necessary adjustments.
Some bugs have already been fixed, but for that I'd have to redownload the game (pro tip: bug fixes should be a patch, never force players to redownload the entire thing).
Because my previous attempt at eliminating Osana failed, mostly due to me not knowing the game's most hidden mechanics and failing, I've decided I would test out every elimination method but this time using guides. In this review I'll be analyzing each method, trying to be as brief as possible. This will be a long review but hopefully I can make it bearable for you.
--------------------------------------------------------------------
Matchmaking Osana
Because Matchmaking doesn't require me to eliminate Raibaru, I've decided this would be the first method I'll use. However I wasn't very eager to try it out, as it seems quite repetitive. First off: stalking Osana to see her likes and dislikes is a good idea, in theory. Unfortunately, if the player is caught off doing other stuff, they can miss the opportunity. The conversations should not happen at such specific times, as the player has no way of knowing when these interactions will take place. And, indeed, because I missed the Monday interactions, I had to buy info from Info-chan which is much less entertaining.
The "follow me" mechanic is confusing. It's easy to get lost in the school, so most of my time was spent trying to find the library, then running back to the suitor to make him follow me again. Why is there a timer to count down when the guy is following you? I understand realism and avoiding exploits, but when it's so easy to just run back and talk to him again it only seems like a waste of time.
Most of the lunchtime was spent on me trying to talk to Osana and do her task. However, she gave me a line of how she's busy right now and can't talk, forcing me to skip ahead time without me really knowing why Osana refused to talk. But, once the task was done, there was nothing else I could do, other than just go home.
The following days were spent in a repetitive cycle. Talk to the suitor, talk to Osana, select good answers, skip to the next day. Having to constantly wait for slow animations makes it even worse. Nothing about this particular method was noteworthy, fun, or memorable. At times, it felt like filler gameplay; no more than something to keep the game going.
At the end, because I didn't wait for the ending sequence and instead skipped ahead, the game glitched out. My fault perhaps, for refusing to download the latest build… but considering it wasn't a simple bug to miss, I have my doubts.
In summary: Matchmaking is a boring, repetitive elimination method that offers no real or fun challenge.
How would I improve it?: In a way, the repetitiveness could be tolerable if there were more in-between events for the player to do. Basically it stems from what I mentioned in the previous review, there's nothing to do at school once you've completed your objective. If, instead, I had to fix this method as it is, I would make it more like a visual novel. Add more of a conversation. Allow the player to think through their answers based on where the conversation is going. Perhaps make Osana take the initiative at some point and have the suitor respond accordingly, instead of it being the other way around. And more importantly, don't make the bar at the top raise or decrease with each "good" answer; instead, I would make it so it raises a specific amount at the end of the date, allowing for more of a challenge but also a margin of error. Easy should not equal boring.
I decided to download the September 22nd build (the time I'm typing this review). Fun fact: my browser recognizes it as a virus LOL.
--------------------------------------------------------------------
Attacking Osana
Before I said I couldn't eliminate Osana because the game didn't allow me to eliminate Raibaru first. Well, guess what, I managed to kill Osana… Using exploits. After successfully matchmaking her with her suitor, Raibaru goes away. Eliminating the suitor is easy, and a friday event makes it so Musume separates them. With this, I could use the same trick to steal a phone: drop water onto Osana and killing her in the baths. Later it was only a matter of getting a clean uniform and dispose of the evidence.
Admittedly, this was slightly more entertaining than the previous methods. When I saw Musume asking Osana to follow her, I saw the opportunity. It was something made with exploits, but at least it was interesting. If the game was made like that, with more opportunities and freedom to the player, it would be much more fun.
However it was still an exploit so I did it the "intended" way. The first step was to get rid of Raibaru, but the only way to get rid of her permanently was to lower her reputation. The first two days were quite a tedious grind, of improving my own reputation and gossiping about Raibaru. This mechanic has the same issue as matchmaking: it's just grind, there is nothing to spice up the gameplay. Either way, I did that and next day Raibaru was gone, so that was cool.
The rest was simple enough. I made Osana follow me to a hidden place near the furnace (inside that garden, hint hint) so no students would see her corpse, then I fought all the delinquents to make them go away (something I wouldn't have known, hadn't I been following development of the game). Unfortunately, as I was carrying Osana's corpse, a student council girl saw me, getting me an instant game over with no way for me to defend myself. Next try, a regular student saw me and because he ran away to fight against me I had to kill him. Sure it was a sloppy murder but at least it worked.
For some reason, though, after everything was done, a teacher called the police because of a "mysterious bloodstain," despite the fact that I'm certain I cleaned everything, even made sure to double-check with yandere vision.
The end was a bit anticlimactic. Not sure what else was I expecting, but considering it's just the demo I'll let it slide.
In summary: The gameplay here was decent. Nothing to write home about, but nothing too terrible either. Raibaru is still a pretty boring/tedious obstacle, and I would argue it would be better if she wasn't there.
How would I improve it?: First, remove the instant game over when a student council member sees Ayano. Players should have a way to defend themselves, even if it's a bit more difficult than a regular student. Also, the consequences can be much bigger when they are killed, so the player would want to avoid being seen by them. Second, make bloodstains more visible in yandere vision, either that or make small bloodstains unnoticeable. Third, the "follow me" mechanic is a bit broken. It's easy to find a concealed spot and kill Osana there. Working around her schedule might be a solution, but make sure the player has access to this information. Fourth, less time to murder your rival would be a good idea. Before school there's two in-game hours to do whatever you want, more than enough to complete this elimination method. And fifth, add more ways to decrease reputation, because the current method is no more than "select option A then option B" over and over.
Bear in mind 3rd and 4th suggestions would not work well for Osana as the tutorial rival, but rather, for future ones. That being said, some systems can be reworked so even the easy rival is fun, even for veteran players.
--------------------------------------------------------------------
Befriend Osana
Some people called this the "best elimination method" so we'll see. Restart the week my boys.
I found a bug with the topic not unlocking even after eavesdropping on the second Monday conversation, which is a bit annoying. After restarting the day, I kept going with the scheme as planned. It was strange how I couldn't put a note in Osana's locker, instead I had to find it first using the menu, then put the note, but details.
As I was waiting I pushed a student off the rooftop, just for the giggles, and the police came just in time for my meeting with Osana. Thought that was funny and decided to share.
The rest of the gameplay is basically an interactive cutscene. Unlike murder, where you have to be prepared for unexpected circumstances, this follows a very detailed plan. The idea of visiting the stalker's house is quite interesting, but again, no more than a cutscene. If this could be reworked I can see it being quite fun, but as I was playing I never felt the sort of adrenaline expected from a stealthy side-mission like this one.
By the way, the voice acting of the stalker's mom and sister is on point.
There's no real reason to avoid the stalker seeing you, as the game progresses the exact same way regardless. Hopefully this is because something is planned for future weeks.
That being said I have to wonder why the final cutscene doesn't have animations. When this method was used with Kokona, it was fully animated; it was all a matter of replacing the models and rewriting the dialogue, so I have to admit I was a bit confused.
In summary: It's good. Not as good as I was expecting, but good. It's just lore at this point rather than gameplay.
How would I improve it?: Definitely by making the stalker's house section more varied, perhaps more challenging, so that they can feel some sort of adrenaline. We are at a stranger's home, and someone who's potentially dangerous, so the gameplay should reflect that. Aside from that, the scheme feels too specific; multiple ways to reach the same end result would be much better for this kind of elimination method.
--------------------------------------------------------------------
Betray Osana
This won't be long. It's the exact same method as Befriend, with only a minor change at the end. Simple summary: there's no real reason to choose one or the other, other than to feel more like a yandere I guess. Betraying Osana has no benefit and only downsides, since I think this method will have more of an impact in Senpai's sanity.
How would I improve it?: There's multiple ways to do so. Because I explained previously how the scheme is so specific, I would consider making it less specific, and depending on how the player decides to help Osana, the game would automatically determine which cutscene would play out. The second option is to simply make Befriend have some sort of negative outcome; perhaps, simply Osana being the one to betray the player by confessing to Senpai anyway, making Betray the safer option but also the one that mostly affects Senpai.
--------------------------------------------------------------------
Expelling Osana
The first part of my playthrough was spent testing out different hairstyles and accessories. Considering we already have all those models available I wonder why Ayano doesn't have some sort of character creation screen as this was probably the most fun I had in the entire game lol (don't blame me, I love creating characters).
Later on I tried stealing Sakyu's ring as the scheme instructed. She saw me however, said "please don't touch that," then continued eating. Even though I had the ring, the game wouldn't let me put it inside Osana's bag. Also, restarting the day doesn't solve the issue as the scheme becomes unavailable.
The problem I have with this is that at no point did the game tell me that this was some sort of "fail state," on the contrary, the scheme kept on going. Even if it did tell me, how is this little interaction an instant fail on the elimination method? Especially when the solution is nothing special: just stand closer to the wall and take the ring; you can't even send a student to distract the sisters, something that would make much more sense mechanically. This little scheme was strange.
Next day, I had to place cigarettes on Osana's bag. Side note, I found it strange that the guidance counselor said possession of cigarettes is illegal, but that's just a nitpick. This scheme is a bit uneventful and there are ways to improve it but let's move on for now.
Next day on the scheme asked me to "wait" until a certain time of day. And tell me, what kind of game would ask the player to "wait"? It can suggest you to wait until a certain time when doing the scheme is more convenient, but there's an issue when the only option available is do nothing.
Next step was to steal the answer sheet and I failed this twice, having to go to the guidance counselor twice. The timing is way too tight here, becoming more frustrating than anything. Then, when I went to report Osana to the guidance counselor, she made no mention of how it was me the one that was trying to steal the answers. It would have been interesting if Ayano had to convince her through a series of answers/manipulation.
In summary: This elimination method feels too specific for no reason. Osana's phone, realistically, could be stolen on the last day; instead, the game requires you to steal it on Monday.
How would I improve it?: I still have serious issues with stealing Sakyu's ring; the way it's done feels more like an exploit or a glitch, not stealthy gameplay, so I would improve it in a way that the sisters have to go away before the ring can be stolen. As for placing cigarettes in Osana's bag, purchasing them from Info-chan is a bit boring. It would be much more interesting if the player was allowed to steal them from another student (say, Musume), then report Osana for both theft and smoking. With this in mind, the effectiveness of this method could be increased or decreased based on the player's actions, allowing for a more fluid gameplay instead of a binary outcome. Also, someone on this sub a while ago pointed out how it would be suspicious for Ayano to be reporting the same students for five days, and that instead it would be better if she could manipulate students into reporting Osana for her. I think this is a great idea and ties well with my previous suggestions: you could threaten Musume with reporting her to the guidance counselor for cigarettes, unless she reports Osana for the same. Finally, make all methods available at all times, and even add more, for more variety and less strict schemes.
--------------------------------------------------------------------
Burn Osana
The only way to kill Raibaru is to get a mind-broken slave, send her to Raibaru, and stab her at the same time. Because the topic of torture is kind of a trigger (and eff movies that constantly show it), I simply made use of debug commands. Apparently, though, the game wasn't made to have a mind-broken slave on Monday, meaning that as soon as I attempted it, everything kind of broke apart at the same time. I couldn't attend class because "a murder was taking place," but Raibaru just froze in place, so I basically softlocked the game.
A few attempts later I could do it… somewhat. The animations still didn't work but as long as the game recognized Raibaru as "dead" I was satisfied.
Anyhow, the rest of the scheme proceeded as usual. The only problem I had with it is how the player has no way of knowing which path Osana will take to the showers (as I put the candle in the school plaza), but that can be avoided by just putting the candle in a more obvious place.
In summary: This elimination method is decent enough. Raibaru is the only annoying thing about it.
How would I improve it?: As I said this one is decent and even easy enough, but it doesn't require much stealth from the player. Perhaps, because this method is more brutal than stabbing Osana, it could have a much more negative effect on Senpai. With other rivals though I expect this method to be a bit more challenging/fun.
--------------------------------------------------------------------
Framing Osana for Murder
This elimination method was actually more fun than the others. It allowed me to go into a killing spree without being caught and without having to dispose of corpses; after all, Osana was to be made responsible for them and Raibaru was not even an issue. I found it a bit annoying that the teachers could always see me trying to dispose of the bloody uniform, as there is no way to distract them or anything, and because of that this method took way too many attempts from me. However, it was fun enough; I think the game is at its most fun in this kind-of-sandbox state.
In summary: Perhaps the best elimination method so far, even though it requires no interaction with Osana.
How would I improve it?: As I've said, the amount of freedom it gives you is great. I think the player should not have so many instant game overs and instead be allowed to get through everything with enough skill. Just like with other methods though, more ways to get Osana's fingerprints would be good. More ways to remove your own fingerprints without the need of being in the drama club, and more ways even to make Osana look suspicious. It is kind of a plot hole how the police arrests her, seeing as she has an alibi (Raibaru) and both know it was Ayano the one who asked her to touch the box cutter. That might need more work.
--------------------------------------------------------------------
Rejecting Osana
If the previous was the best elimination method, this one is easily the second-best. I think this is one example of a well-designed method, even though it needs tweaking. Personally, I've been relying on schemes this entire time, as a new player. However, in this particular case, schemes take away much of the fun with it.
When I say this elimination method is well designed, it's because the player can get all the information they need right from the start. Osana speaks with Senpai right when the day begins, saying what they will do later, meaning the player can now use that information to their advantage.
The problem I have is with certain days. For example, throwing Senpai's book inside the fountain is a simple enough solution. However, recording Osana's conversation with Musume with a directional mic then going into the computer lab to edit said conversation and save it into Osana's phone seems like way too convoluted for the player to guess without the use of the scheme.
In summary: It's well designed and more elimination methods should follow this formula, but making it in a way that the player can do it without the need of a guide. This method also suffers from the same issue as expelling Osana in being too specific at times and not allowing a lot of choices.
How would I improve it?: Changing Osana's interactions with Senpai completely. Sabotaging their events doesn't have to be easy, but I guess… realistic? Also, it might be a good idea to sabotage them in a way that reinforces a negative aspect of Osana. For example, her being a tsundere makes Musume's conversation kind of believable, but her having a girl's panty shot is a bit strange for her. Definitely the biggest change though is to remove or rework Info-chan's scheme in a way that makes the player think through more.
--------------------------------------------------------------------
A few other elimination methods
Because the rest is more of the same, I just got them here in a little list.
Crushing Osana: This one is pretty easy, just like the burn Osana scheme. There's not much skill required and it's easy to get away with murder using this method.
Decapitating Osana: Decent again, although there's no way to cover up your crime. It seems there's finally a little use for the sanity meter, but because it's so easy to restore it, it kind of seems like a cosmetic effect in this case.
--------------------------------------------------------------------
Miscellaneous
--------------------------------------------------------------------
Final Thoughts on the Demo (Too Long, Didn't Read)
As I said in my previous review, the demo needs a lot of work still. It clearly has something going for it, but gameplay-wise it needs more work.
Mainly, the game is lacking in things to do. Waiting for something to happen is awful for any game, and the solutions are to include more content or rework how time works in the game. One of my suggestions is to include more side-quests and follow side-storylines. Again, Yandere Simulator has a lot of lore going for it, so why not take advantage of that? Each student's profile has a good amount of information and backstory about them, why not, instead of just doing a task for them, make the player follow a side story to gain certain advantages?
Example: Sakyu Basu and Inkyu Basu are said to be demons. Simply make the player follow a storyline where they try to uncover their real identity, and if they beat it, they could gain a simple perk such as… being more respected with the Occult Club, a reputation increase, or any other stat increase. This system is a bit similar to Persona 5, and seeing that game is already an inspiration, it would be a good idea. Sure, that means more work ahead, but also it means the game could be more fun and interesting to play.
That being said we should be aware of limitations. While this solution might be more fun, in the long run it'll take a lot of time to implement. Instead, reworking in-game time is perhaps the most sensible solution in this case. Knowing when to stop adding features is as important as knowing what to add, though that's a question that anyone in a development team has to ask themselves.
A side note before moving on: The game clearly doesn't know what it wants to be, so even though some of my previous suggestions might work well in their respective methods, they might not work completely as a cohesive idea and need more brainstorming than just an afternoon. Example the matchmaking suggestion; YanSim is not a visual novel, so more stealthy/manipulative methods might be more effective for this type of game.
As for what the game is at the moment, this might be a hard pill to swallow, but I think it's time to go back to the drawing board. The game isn't fun, it isn't terribly boring either but for the six years it took to get to this point it isn't anything impressive. Again the fact that this is "91% complete" is extremely worrying because a lot of its elements just don't work well together. So it might be a good idea to step back, think about what the game really needs, and work on that.
The problem is that YandereDev clearly can't see that as a viable option and I can understand that. Hate and disappointment would be the words of the day and the game would lack support because of it.
So instead, I'd say keep going with the crowdfunding campaign, but after a team is assembled, go back to the basics and start from scratch. Some of the current elements can be reused; as I said, the game does have something going for it, but trying to fix everything that went wrong would be much more expensive than just starting over, and I think that's the best solution at this point.
It's nothing I see happening soon, but I am aware that a lot of people are trying to make their own Yandere Simulator games. Hopefully this overly-long review can help any of them.
See you all around!
submitted by Tagerii to Osana [link] [comments]

An introduction to Linux through Windows Subsystem for Linux

I'm working as an Undergraduate Learning Assistant and wrote this guide to help out students who were in the same boat I was in when I first took my university's intro to computer science course. It provides an overview of how to get started using Linux, guides you through setting up Windows Subsystem for Linux to run smoothly on Windows 10, and provides a very basic introduction to Linux. Students seemed to dig it, so I figured it'd help some people in here as well. I've never posted here before, so apologies if I'm unknowingly violating subreddit rules.

Getting Windows Subsystem for Linux running smoothly on Windows 10

GitHub Pages link

Introduction and motivation

tl;dr skip to next section
So you're thinking of installing a Linux distribution, and are unsure where to start. Or you're an unfortunate soul using Windows 10 in CPSC 201. Either way, this guide is for you. In this section I'll give a very basic intro to some of options you've got at your disposal, and explain why I chose Windows Subsystem for Linux among them. All of these have plenty of documentation online so Google if in doubt.

Setting up WSL

So if you've read this far I've convinced you to use WSL. Let's get started with setting it up. The very basics are outlined in Microsoft's guide here, I'll be covering what they talk about and diving into some other stuff.

1. Installing WSL

Press the Windows key (henceforth Winkey) and type in PowerShell. Right-click the icon and select run as administrator. Next, paste in this command:
dism.exe /online /enable-feature /featurename:Microsoft-Windows-Subsystem-Linux /all /norestart 
Now you'll want to perform a hard shutdown on your computer. This can become unecessarily complicated because of Window's fast startup feature, but here we go. First try pressing the Winkey, clicking on the power icon, and selecting Shut Down while holding down the shift key. Let go of the shift key and the mouse, and let it shutdown. Great! Now open up Command Prompt and type in
wsl --help 
If you get a large text output, WSL has been successfully enabled on your machine. If nothing happens, your computer failed at performing a hard shutdown, in which case you can try the age-old technique of just holding down your computer's power button until the computer turns itself off. Make sure you don't have any unsaved documents open when you do this.

2. Installing Ubuntu

Great! Now that you've got WSL installed, let's download a Linux distro. Press the Winkey and type in Microsoft Store. Now use the store's search icon and type in Ubuntu. Ubuntu is a Debian-based Linux distribution, and seems to have the best integration with WSL, so that's what we'll be going for. If you want to be quirky, here are some other options. Once you type in Ubuntu three options should pop up: Ubuntu, Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, and Ubuntu 18.04 LTS.
![Windows Store](https://theshepord.github.io/intro-to-WSL/docs/images/winstore.png) Installing plain-old "Ubuntu" will mean the app updates whenever a new major Ubuntu distribution is released. The current version (as of 09/02/2020) is Ubuntu 20.04.1 LTS. The other two are older distributions of Ubuntu. For most use-cases, i.e. unless you're running some software that will break when upgrading, you'll want to pick the regular Ubuntu option. That's what I did.
Once that's done installing, again hit Winkey and open up Ubuntu. A console window should open up, asking you to wait a minute or two for files to de-compress and be stored on your PC. All future launches should take less than a second. It'll then prompt you to create a username and password. I'd recommend sticking to whatever your Windows username and password is so that you don't have to juggle around two different usepassword combinations, but up to you.
Finally, to upgrade all your packages, type in
sudo apt-get update 
And then
sudo apt-get upgrade 
apt-get is the Ubuntu package manager, this is what you'll be using to install additional programs on WSL.

3. Making things nice and crispy: an introduction to UNIX-based filesystems

tl;dr skip to the next section
The two above steps are technically all you need for running WSL on your system. However, you may notice that whenever you open up the Ubuntu app your current folder seems to be completely random. If you type in pwd (for Present Working Directory, 'directory' is synonymous with 'folder') inside Ubuntu and hit enter, you'll likely get some output akin to /home/. Where is this folder? Is it my home folder? Type in ls (for LiSt) to see what files are in this folder. Probably you won't get any output, because surprise surprise this folder is not your Windows home folder and is in fact empty (okay it's actually not empty, which we'll see in a bit. If you type in ls -a, a for All, you'll see other files but notice they have a period in front of them, which tells bash that they should be hidden by default. Anyways).
So where is my Windows home folder? Is WSL completely separate from Windows? Nope! This is Windows Subsystem for Linux after all. Notice how, when you typed pwd earlier, the address you got was /home/. Notice that forward-slash right before home. That forward-slash indicates the root directory (not to be confused with the /root directory), which is the directory at the top of the directory hierarchy and contains all other directories in your system. So if we type ls /, you'll see what are the top-most directories in your system. Okay, great. They have a bunch of seemingly random names. Except, shocker, they aren't random. I've provided a quick run-down in Appendix A.
For now, though, we'll focus on /mnt, which stands for mount. This is where your C drive, which contains all your Windows stuff, is mounted. So if you type ls /mnt/c, you'll begin to notice some familiar folders. Type in ls /mnt/c/Users, and voilà, there's your Windows home folder. Remember this filepath, /mnt/c/Users/. When we open up Ubuntu, we don't want it tossing us in this random /home/ directory, we want our Windows home folder. Let's change that!

4. Changing your default home folder

Type in sudo vim /etc/passwd. You'll likely be prompted for your Ubuntu's password. sudo is a command that gives you root privileges in bash (akin to Windows's right-click then selecting 'Run as administrator'). vim is a command-line text-editing tool, kinda like an even crummier Notepad, which is a pain to use at first but bear with me and we can pull through. /etc/passwd is a plaintext file that does not store passwords, as the name would suggest, but rather stores essential user info used every time you open up WSL.
Anyway, once you've typed that in, your shell should look something like this: ![vim /etc/passwd](https://theshepord.github.io/intro-to-WSL/docs/images/vim-etc-passwd.png)
Using arrow-keys, find the entry that begins with your Ubuntu username. It should be towards the bottom of the file. In my case, the line looks like
theshep:x:1000:1000:,,,:/home/pizzatron3000:/bin/bash 
See that cringy, crummy /home/pizzatron3000? Not only do I regret that username to this day, it's also not where we want our home directory. Let's change that! Press i to initiate vim's -- INSERT -- mode. Use arrow-keys to navigate to that section, and delete /home/ by holding down backspace. Remember that filepath I asked you to remember? /mnt/c/Users/. Type that in. For me, the line now looks like
theshep:x:1000:1000:,,,:/mnt/c/Users/lucas:/bin/bash 
Next, press esc to exit insert mode, then type in the following:
:wq 
The : tells vim you're inputting a command, w means write, and q means quit. If you've screwed up any of the above sections, you can also type in :q! to exit vim without saving the file. Just remember to exit insert mode by pressing esc before inputting commands, else you'll instead be writing to the file.
Great! If you now open up a new terminal and type in pwd, you should be in your Window's home folder! However, things seem to be lacking their usual color...

5. Importing your configuration files into the new home directory

Your home folder contains all your Ubuntu and bash configuration files. However, since we just changed the home folder to your Window's home folder, we've lost these configuration files. Let's bring them back! These configuration files are hidden inside /home/, and they all start with a . in front of the filename. So let's copy them over into your new home directory! Type in the following:
cp -r /home//* ~ 
cp stands for CoPy, -r stands for recursive (i.e. descend into directories), the * is a Kleene Star and means "grab everything that's here", and the ~ is a quick way of writing your home directory's filepath (which would be /mnt/c/Users/) without having to type all that in again. Once you've run this, all your configuration files should now be present in your new home directory. Configuration files like .bashrc, .profile, and .bash_profile essentially provides commands that are run whenever you open a new shell. So now, if you open a new shell, everything should be working normally. Amazing. We're done!

6. Tips & tricks

Here are two handy commands you can add to your .profile file. Run vim ~/.profile, then, type these in at the top of the .profile file, one per line, using the commands we discussed previously (i to enter insert mode, esc to exit insert mode, :wq to save and quit).
alias rm='rm -i' makes it so that the rm command will always ask for confirmation when you're deleting a file. rm, for ReMove, is like a Windows delete except literally permanent and you will lose that data for good, so it's nice to have this extra safeguard. You can type rm -f to bypass. Linux can be super powerful, but with great power comes great responsibility. NEVER NEVER NEVER type in rm -rf /, this is saying 'delete literally everything and don't ask for confirmation', your computer will die. You've been warned. Be careful.
export DISPLAY=:0 if you install XLaunch VcXsrv, this line allows you to open graphical interfaces through Ubuntu. The export sets the environment variable DISPLAY, and the :0 tells Ubuntu that it should use the localhost display.

Appendix A: overview of top-level UNIX directories

tl;dr only mess with /mnt, /home, and maybe maybe /usr. Don't touch anything else.
  • bin: binaries, contains Ubuntu binary (aka executable) files that are used in bash. Here you'll find the binaries that execute commands like ls and pwd. Similar to /usbin, but bin gets loaded earlier in the booting process so it contains the most important commands.
  • boot: contains information for operating system booting. Empty in WSL, because WSL isn't an operating system.
  • dev: devices, contains information for Ubuntu to communicate with I/O devices. One useful file here is /dev/null, which is basically an information black hole that automatically deletes any data you pass it.
  • etc: no idea why it's called etc, but it contains system-wide configuration files
  • home: equivalent to Window's C:/Users folder, contains home folders for the different users. In an Ubuntu system, under /home/ you'd find the Documents folder, Downloads folder, etc.
  • lib: libraries used by the system
  • lib64 64-bit libraries used by the system
  • mnt: mount, where your drives are located
  • opt: third-party applications that don't have any dependencies outside the scope of their own package
  • proc: process information, contains details about your Linux system, kind of like Windows's C:/Windows folder
  • run: directory for programs to store runtime information. Similarly to /bin vs /usbin, run has the same function as /varun, but gets loaded sooner in the boot process.
  • srv: server folder, holds data to be served in protocols like ftp, www, cvs, and others
  • sys: system, used by the Linux kernel to set or obtain information about the host system
  • tmp: temporary, runtime files that are cleared out after every reboot. Kinda like RAM in that way.
  • usr: contains additional UNIX commands, header files for compiling C programs, among other things. Most of everything you install using apt-get ends up here.
  • var: variable, contains variable data such as logs, databases, e-mail etc, but that persist across different boots.

Appendix B: random resources

submitted by HeavenBuilder to learnprogramming [link] [comments]

List of New Supported Games and FAQ.

Hey guys! Here is a list of all the new supported games, you can download the Nucleus Co-Op scripts from the app now, the games listed here that are clickable link you to a guide but all are supported. You can also see all available scripts from the app now by pressing the view all option.
10 Miles to Safety
20XX
100% Orange Juice
200% Mixed Juice!
Abyssal Zone
Acceleration of SUGURI 2
Accel World VS. Sword Art Online Deluxe Edition
A Hat in Time
Air Missions: HIND
Alien Breed Impact
Alien Breed 2: Assault
Alien Breed 3: Descent
Aliens Colonial Marines
Aliens vs Predator
Alien Swarm: Reactive Drop
Among Us
Aragami: Shadow Edition
ARK: Survival Evolved
Ashen (steam version only)
Astroneer
Attack on Titan 2
ATV Drift & Tricks
Barony
Battle Grounds III
Binary Domain
BioShock 2
Bit Dungeon III
Blades of Time
Bladestorm: Nightmare
Blood and Bacon
Bob Was Hungry
Borderlands
Borderlands 2
Borderlands: The Pre-Sequel
Borderlands GOTY Enhanced
Borderlands 3
BrainBread 2
Broomstick League
Brütal Legend
Bulletstorm: Full Clip Edition
Bunch of Heroes
Call of Duty: Black Ops II
CastleMiner Z
Clandestine
Cladun Returns: This is Segoku
Chivalry: Medieval Warfare
Citadel: Forged With Fire
Code of Princess
Conan Exiles (16 june 2020 update added Funcom Live Services and now the game is online only effectively breaking the splitscreen script. You need to downgrade to the previous version.)
Contagion
Contra: Rogue Corps
Counter-Strike: Source
Craftopia
Cube World
Cyberdimension Neptunia: 4 Goddesses Online
Daemon X Machina
Damnation
Dark Souls: Prepare to Die Edition
Day of Defeat: Source
Day of Infamy
Deadfall Adventures
Dead Island
Dead Island: DE
Dead Island Riptide: DE
Dead Rising 2
Dead Rising 2: Off the Record
Dead Rising 3
Dead Rising 4
Deathtrap
Debris
Deep Rock Galactic
Desolate
Dinosaur Hunt
Divinity: Dragon Commander
Divinity: Original Sin Enhanced Edition
Divinity: Original Sin 2
Don't Starve Together
Door Kickers
Double Action: Boogaloo
Dragon Ball Xenoverse
Dragon Ball: Xenoverse 2
Dragon Marked for Death
Dragon Quest Builders 2
Drake Hollow
Dungeon of the Endless
Dungeons 3
Dungeon Siege III
Dying Light
Dystopia
Earth Defense Force 4.1
Earth Defense Force 5
Earth Defense Force: Insect Armageddon
Earth Defense Force: Iron Rain
Earthfall
Enemy Front
E.T. Armies
F1 2012
F1 2014
Fade to Silence
Factorio
Fallout 76
F.E.A.R. 3
Final Exam
Feel The Snow
Fight The Dragon
Fistful of Frags
Forge Quest
Fortified
Front Mission Evolved
Full Mojo Rampage
Garry's Mod
Gas Guzzlers Extreme
Generation Zero
Gensokyo Defenders
GOCCO OF WAR
God Eater Resurrection
God Eater 2 - Rage Burst
God Eater 3
God Mode
Golf It!
Grid 2
Grim Dawn
Ground Branch
GTFO
Guns n Zombies
Half-Life Deathmatch: Source
Half-Life 2: Deathmatch
Half-Minute Hero: The Second
Halo Custom Edition
Halo 2 LAN
Halo 2: Project Cartographer
Halo Online ElDewrito
Halo: The Master Chief Collection
Halo Wars: Definitive Edition
Hammerwatch
Hero Siege
Hoard
Hunted: The Demon’s Forge
Human: Fall Flat
I am Weapon: Revival
Insurgency
Iron Brigade
It came from space, and ate our brains
Kane & Lynch 2: Dog Days
KATANA KAMI: A Way of the Samurai Story
Killing Floor
Killing Floor 2
Killsquad
Kill to Collect
Lead and Gold: Gangs of the Wild West
Left 4 Dead 2
LEGO Worlds
Livelock
Lord of the Rings War in the North
Lost Planet 3
Magicite
McDroid
Mean Greens - Plastic Warfare
Mighty No. 9
Minecraft Java Edition
Monday Night Combat
Mordheim: City of the Damned
Morphies Law
Mothergunship
MudRunner
NanoWars
NASCAR '15 Victory Edition
Necropolis
Need For Speed Most Wanted 2005
Nioh: Complete Edition
Niffelheim
No Man's Sky
No More Room in Hell
Outbreak
Outbreak: TNN
Outland
Outward
Orcs Must Die! 2
ORION: Prelude
OVERKILL's The Walking Dead
Pacify
Paint the Town Red
PAYDAY: The Heist
PAYDAY 2
Pirates, Vikings, and Knights II
PixARK
PixelJunk Nom Nom Galaxy
Portal Knights
Prevent The Fall
Primal Carnage: Extinction
Project CARS 2
Pure
Raft
Rage
Re:Legend
Remnant: From the Ashes
Resident Evil 5
Resident Evil 6
Resident Evil Revelations
Re-Volt (RVGL)
RimWorld
Risk of Rain 2
Roguelands
Ryse: Son of Rome
Sacred 3
Saints Row The Third
Saints Row IV
Saints Row: Gat out of Hell
Sanctum
Sanctum 2
Scourge Outbreak
Secrets of Grindea
Senran Kagura: Shinovi Versus
Senran Kagura: Estival Versus
Senran Kagura: Peach Beach Splash
Serious Sam 2
Seven Days to Die
Sir, You Are Being Hunted
SkyDrift
Sniper Elite 3
Space Engineers
Space Hulk: Deathwing
Spec Ops: The Line
Spintires
Starbound
Stardew Valley
Star Wars: Battlefront 2 (Classic, 2005)
Strange Brigade
Strength of the Sword: ULTIMATE
Styx: Shards of Darkness
Super Mario 64
Super Mario 64 PC Port
Survivalist
Sven Coop
Sword Art Online Re: Hollow Fragment
Sword Art Online: Lost Song
Sword Art Online: Hollow Realization Deluxe Edition
Synergy
SYNTHETIK: Arena
SYNTHETIK: Legion Rising
Takedown: Red Sabre
Team Fortress 2
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Mutants in Manhattan
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows
Terraria
TerraTech
The Blackout Club
The Darkness 2
The Forest
The Haunted: Hells Reach
theHunter: Call of the Wild
The Incredible Adventures of Van Helsing
The Incredible Adventures of Van Helsing II
The Incredible Adventures of Van Helsing III
The Incredible Adventures of Van Helsing Final Cut
The Mean Greens - Plastic Warfare
The Simple Apocalypse
The Survivalists
The Watchers
Tokyo Ghoul:re Call to Exist
Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six: Vegas 2
Tomb Raider
Torchlight II
Toukiden: Kiwami
Toukiden 2
TOXIKK
Unending Dusk
Unepic
Unloved
Unreal Tournament III
Umbrella Corps
Vagante
Warcraft III: The Frozen Throne
Warcraft III: Reign of Chaos
Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine
We Were Here Together
White Noise 2
World in Conflict: Complete Edition
Wreckfest
XCOM: Enemy Within
Zeno Clash II
Zombie Army Trilogy
Zombie Panic! Source

Frequently Asked Questions & Troubleshooting

(Under Construction, last updated: 11/08/20)
Q: What is Nucleus Co-Op?
A: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jbituCgu3Bc
Nucleus Co-Op is a free and open source tool for Windows that allows split-screen play on many games that do not initially support it. The app was originally created by Lucas Assis. Zerofox later took over and added a ton of new features and improvements to support a lot more games. Ilyaki later joined in and brought multiple keyboards/mice support and more great features to the table. The app is currently being developed and updated by these devs: Lucas Assis, Zerofox and Ilyaki.
R-mach too for making and supporting the website that hosts the Nucleus Co-Op scripts.
Also the further development of the app wouldn't have been possible without all the amazing contributions and hard work from the SplitScreen Dreams Discord members (which include the devs mentioned above) that made all the new Nucleus Co-Op scripts and continue to make new discoveries and scripts to support even more games, among them: Talos91, PoundlandBacon, dr. old.boi, Pizzo and many more.
Q: How does Nucleus Co-Op work?
A: Essentially Nucleus Co-Op opens multiple instances of the same game (some games require mutex killing for that, among other methods) that will only answer to one specific gamepad (we do this via Nucleus Co-Op custom xinput dlls or xinput plus dlls) and connects those instances via LAN or steamworks online multiplayer emulation (Goldberg Emulator), all while making sure all the windows have focus so they can be playable with gamepads or that the instances are playable even in the background. Nucleus then resizes, removes borders and repositions the games windows so you can have synthetic splitscreen to play locally with your friends.
Q: Which games can be splitscreened using Nucleus Co-Op?
A: There are a lot of supported games, all mentioned in the list above. A ton of games are now supported thanks to the amazing program called Goldberg Emulator, developed by Mr. Goldberg, a big thank you to him. Read the Goldberg FAQ if you want to know more.
Q: Where do I download Nucleus Co-Op?
A: You can download latest version from Github. Download the compiled .rar release, don't download the source code zip if you just want to use the app. Zerofox's mod v0.9.9.9 r4 is the latest version recent scripts are created for, please avoid other versions for now.
Q: How do I use Nucleus Co-Op?
A: Here is a quick video tutorial: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hWmvz59i-o0
1.- Download and exctract Nucleus Co-Op (extract using apps like 7-zip or winrar).
2.- Open NucleusCoop.exe.
3.- Click on Download Game Scripts, the script browser will open. Search for a game in the supported games list and download a script. You can also see all available scripts from the app now by pressing the view all option.
4.- Once the script has finished downloading you will get a prompt asking if you would like to add a game now, click yes if you want to add it now, if you select no proceed to step 6.
5.- Next you need to find where your game's executable is located. If you're not sure, try Googling 'where is (game) installed' and just search for the .exe in the place they tell you to look for. For Steam games this is usually something along the lines of 'C:\Program Files\Steam\steamapps\common(game)'. Some games will have their real .exe stashed away in a folder called 'bin' or 'binaries'. Once you choose the right .exe, add the game.
6.- You can also automatically add games, click 'Auto-Search' and select the drive and path you want to add games from.
7.- Once your game is added, select it in the Nucleus UI and drag the gamepad icons to the splitscreen layout, click on the top-left icon on the layout corner to change the type of splitscreen layout. You can also use multiple monitors, if you have multiple monitors connected they will show in the Nucleus UI. If you see Script Author's Notes appear at the bottom of the UI, read them carefully.
8.- Finally press > then Play (top right of the UI) and you are ready to go.
Q: Where should I place the Nucleus Co-Op folder?
A: You can place the folder wherever you like as long as you keep the following in mind:
DO NOT place it inside a folder containing files for a game you wish to play.
Avoid placing it inside a folder that has security settings applied to is, such as program files, program files (x86).
Some scripts require the Nucleus Co-Op folder to be located on the same drive as the game files.
If you are still unsure where to place the folder, the root of the drive your games are installed on is usually a safe option.
Q: How do I play with an uneven amount of players (such as 3 players) without having an empty space?
A: Right click on a section of the splitscreen layout.
Q: Nucleus Co-Op doesn't launch, how do I fix it?
A: Here are a few things you can try:
1.- Try updating your Microsoft.net framework, and install/reinstall Visual C++ 2010-2017.
2.- Make sure your antivirus program is not blocking Nucleus Co-Op or deleting any of its files.
3.- Run Nucleus Co-Op as admin.
4.- Restart your PC, and try again.
Q: Does Nucleus Co-Op have any malware?
A: Absolutely not.
Q: I wish to help out with the project, how can I get in touch?
A: Join the Nucleus Co-Op discord community or contact us here in the subreddit.
Q: When support for X game?
A: Not all games are easy to splitscreen, if you want to suggest a game make a post with the title [Request] Name of the game and provide useful information like if the game supports LAN or dedicated servers, if it is available on Steam or in other services, if it uses external servers for online, if it has gamepad support etc. Also you can contact any of our experienced Nucleus scripters here or in the Nucleus Co-Op discord and ask if a script is possible. The main scripter is the OP of this post for instance. Remember that Scripters are limited by the games they own and can test on, so if you really want support for a game to be added consider donating the game to the scripter in question.
Q: How do I know when a script gets updated?
A: Scripts updates are always announced in the Nucleus Co-Op discord server in the channel scripts updates.
Q: How do I create my own splitscreen script for Nucleus Co-Op?
A: Here is the documentation, open the .js file with notepad to read it. You can also use the other scripts you download from Nucleus as reference, they get downloaded to the Nucleus scripts folder. If you create a working script or if you have any questions about Nucleus scripting you can ask us in the Nucleus Co-Op discord or here in the subreddit, we can help you improve your script so it is fully working for sharing with the community.
Q: Does Nucleus Co-Op work on Linux/Mac?
A: Nucleus Co-Op depends on a lot of Windows functions and APIs, at the moment it only works on Windows 7 and Up. If you are interested in porting Nucleus Co-Op to other operating systems please feel free to contact any of the developers.
Q: Where can I report a bug/issue?
A: Note that Nucleus Co-Op is a tool in development and still in Alpha. Expect bugs, glitches and weird things to happen. Help other people not have these things happen by checking for a solution here and submitting a [BUG REPORT] to the reddit as a new topic or in the comments here, if no-one else has brought it up. Make sure you have read the script notes in the Nucleus UI very carefully first before submitting anything.
A good [BUG REPORT] looks like this:
Thread name: [BUG REPORT] Simon falling off horse
BUG: Simon falls off his horse.
EXPECTED: Simon should not fall off his horse, right?
CAUSE: I'm pretty sure it's because I have my computer plugged into an auto-blow.
STEPS TO REPRODUCE
1.- Open up Simon Stays On His Horse: The Interactive Video Game of the Movie.
2.- Choose Co-Op and join with another player.
3.- Simon falls off his horse!!!
TYPE: Severe! The gameplay can't continue if Simon isn't on his horse! (Alternatively, Minor if the gameplay can continue but it's just annoying)
NUCLEUS OPTIONS: I played with 2 players using the vertical splitscreen (left and right) on one tv and 2 famicom controllers. I'm using the latest version
SYSTEM: I'm on Windows 3.1 with 4MB of RAM, a 2KHz CPU and no graphics card, playing on a projector. She's a monster.
I'd really like this to get fixed please thanks magic man! -Beanboy"
Keep in mind most scripts are made and tested using the latest legit steam versions of a game, so provide information about what version of the game you have.
Also provide a debug log of the NucleusCoop error or crash, enable the debug log in Nucleus UI settings and save, the debug log will be created in Nucleus root folder where the .exe is. You can also ask for support in our discord.
Q: Why is Nucleus Co-Op resizing the game instances incorrectly/the instances look stretched?
A: Try setting your monitor scale to 100% in your monitoTV resolution settings. It is also highly recommended that you add custom resolutions to all your monitors from your AMD/Nvidia/Intel panel (For example if you are using a monitor resolution of 1920x1080 add custom resolutions like 960x540, 1920x540, 960x1080, ect.) that way most games will be able to see and use those custom resolutions and the splitscreen will not look stretched(Example). Note that not all games support custom or ultra widescreen resolutions. Also try disabling the Nucleus status window in Nucleus UI settings and save.
Q: Why is Nucleus Co-Op throwing an error message that it can not find a file when launching a script?
A: A lot of scripts edit the game's .ini or .cfg files to force windowed and to adjust the game's resolution to the window size, so make you sure you run your game at least once and change some graphic settings before running it via Nucleus Co-Op, that way you make sure the proper config files are getting generated first. If you are still getting the error after doing that, select the game in the UI, click on Game Options and select Delete UserProfile Config Path for all players. Also try disabling the Nucleus status window in Nucleus UI settings and save.
Q: Where are my Nucleus Co-Op save files located?
A: Some scripts save to the Nucleus Co-Op enviroment folder located in C:\Users\YourUser\NucleusCoop, you can access each game save file via the Nucleus Co-Op UI too, select a game, click on Game Options and select Open UserProfile Save/Config Path. Other scripts just save in the same file path your regular game saves to.
Q: Why are my in-game frames per second low/better in one instance than in the others when using Nucleus Co-Op?
A: Remember that Nucleus Co-Op opens multiple instances of a game, so depending on the game this can be quite demanding for your PC, to improve FPS and performance try reducing graphics settings like textures and shadows, limit the FPS or unfocus all the game windows so that they get equal priority and the FPS even out, you can do this by Alt-Tabbing to a different window like the Nucleus app window, the game windows will still remain on top, you can also press the windows key+b in your keyboard to unfocus all instances.
Q: My Playstation/generic PC controller isn't working/isn't being detected by Nucleus Co-Op, how do I fix it?
A: Most Nucleus Co-Op Scripts only detect Xinput gamepads. Controllers that work best are Xbox 360 game controllers for minimum hassle. There are a few scripts that also support Direct Input gamepads but Xinput gamepads are generally a lot easier to restrict to a specific game instance than Dinput gamepads.
If you are using PS4 gamepads try the app DS4windows, look in the settings for an option called "hide ds4 controller" - make sure it's ticked. To ensure it's definitely running in exclusive mode make sure ds4windows is set to load on windows startup, then turn your controllers on while windows is loading. Download the latest version here - https://ryochan7.github.io/ds4windows-site/
Read more about how to use exclusive mode here: https://github.com/Ryochan7/DS4Windows/wiki/Exclusive-Mode-(Hide-DS4-Controller-config-option)-tips-and-issues
If you are using generic dinput gamepads the app XOutput is also useful to emulate xinput gamepads.
The app X360CE version 4 that creates virtual Xbox 360 Controllers inside your Windows operating system is also very useful to emulate xinput gamepads system wide.
Remember that some games detect both dinput and xinput gamepads so even if you are emulating a xinput gamepad the input could still not be restricted correctly because the game is now responding to both the emulated xinput gamepad and to the native direct input of your gamepad, that is why some apps like DS4windows have an "exclusive mode".
Also do not place any x360ce xinput dlls inside the Nucleus Co-Op files as this might interfere with Nucleus custom xinput dlls.
Xbox One gamepads have some issues with background input in games that only support direct input gamepads and with Unity games that use Unity's default input for gamepad support.
If you are using steam controllers try this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wy4F2eqTXQ4
Q: Why is my keyboard not showing in the Nucleus Co-Op UI?
A: If a script is only showing gamepads and not keyboard icons that means the script only supports gamepads and doesn't support keyboards and mice in splitscreen yet.
Q: There are many keyboards and mice icons in the UI, how do I know which ones to use?
A: If you press a key in the keyboard you will use or move the mouse their corresponding icons in the Nucleus Co-Op UI will light up yellow. The app can detect keyboard macros that is why sometimes you will get multiple keyboard icons.
Q: Can you play splitscreen+LAN in different PCs?
A: Yes, if you run the game via Nucleus Co-Op in different PCs you can connect all instances you launch via LAN, for example you can have 2 players playing vertical splitscreen in one PC via Nucleus and connect to 2 others playing Nucleus splitscreen in a different PC via LAN. If the script uses steamworks multiplayer emulation you'll have to change the instances steam ids in the other PCs you'll connect to, otherwise the instances launched by Nucleus will use the same steam ids and won't be able to connect to each other. For that you can open the game script .js file in Nucleus scripts folder in the other PCs and add for example Game.PlayerSteamIDs = [ "76561198134585131","76561198131394153","76561198011792067","76561198043762785" ]; that will change the default ids of the first four instances you open in one PC via Nucleus Co-Op.
Q: This project is Amazing where can I donate?
A: We don't have an unified donation platform yet but you can support the devs individually here: Zerofox, Ilyaki, Lucas Assis.
You can also donate to our main scripters that make the games scripts for Nucleus: Talos91/blackman9
submitted by blackman9 to nucleuscoop [link] [comments]

Binary Options OTC Tips and Tricks - YouTube binäre optionen tutorial, binäre optionen tipps und tricks Binary Options Tips and Tricks - YouTube binäre optionen tipps und tricks, binäre optionen ...

10 Quick Binary Options Tips and Tricks. Do you want to get the most out of trading binary options? Of course you do. That’s why you are going to read our quick tips and tricks for success! If you have explored most of the other articles on our site, you probably are already familiar with a lot of this advice. But a quick review never hurts, and if you are a beginner, this is a great ... Binäre Optionen Strategie (11/20): Was müssen Trader beachten? Die besten Trading Tipps zum Einstieg Wissen nutzen & Binäre Optionen Strategie testen. Review of the Binary Options Tips and Tricks. On this website, I showed you different techniques to improve your trading results with Binary Options. You will get more profitable trades if you follow my tips and tricks. In conclusion, there are a lot of different mistakes traders make. Often they do not know what they are doing and then they wonder why they lose a huge amount of money. As ... Binary Options Site Reviews; Make More Money with Binary Options; We will now introduce you to some savvy ways that you are going to be able to trade Binary Options online, these various hints and tips cannot be guaranteed to make sustained profits, however when you take notice of them you may find yourself placing more winning trades than you ... Tips & Tricks; Binary Options Tips and Tricks for the Ultimate Beginner . Retail traders come to the binary options industry attracted by the fabulous returns. For any given trade, binary options brokers offer above 70% rate of return. Who wouldn’t want such a profit for a trade? The answer is that many fall prey to this illusion. The binary options brokers offer a rate or return much below ... Most of you already know what binary options are, as you are here for the top tips and tricks on trading binary options. But, for the uninitiated, we will give a short brief. Binary Options are financial instruments that allow you to trade on all kinds of assets such as forex, stocks, futures, crypto, indices, and much more. There are only two directions in binary trading and this is where it ... One of the most important binary options trading tips. Although this is only one factor when choosing a broker, it is always one of the top trading tricks to see what bonuses are on offer. If you take advantage of a 100% matching bonus, for example, you can allocate the bonus money differently to how you would trade with your own money. Some traders use the bonus money to try out different

[index] [1372] [22629] [27446] [3577] [5595] [21841] [27559] [19351] [4684] [26186]

Binary Options OTC Tips and Tricks - YouTube

Enjoy the videos and music you love, upload original content, and share it all with friends, family, and the world on YouTube. binäre optionen tutorial, binäre optionen tipps und tricks http://bitlye.com/7k7yHv Treten Sie uns bei und werden Sie reich mit der Crypto Trader! Mitglie... Binäre Optionen bergen aufgrund der Volatilität des zugrunde liegenden Marktes ein hohes Risiko für Ihr Kapital. Diese Produkte eignen sich nicht für alle Anleger. Daher sollten Sie ... Enjoy the videos and music you love, upload original content, and share it all with friends, family, and the world on YouTube. binäre optionen tipps und tricks, binäre optionen trendfolgestrategie http://bitlye.com/7k7yHv Der Bitcoin Macht Menschen ReichUnd du könntest dich weiter... binäre Optionen tipps binäre Optionen tricks binäre Optionen system binäre Optionen sicher handeln binäre Optionen ratgeber binäre Optionen pdf anyoption hütchenstrategie hütchen strategie ...

http://arab-binary-option.arpaverfpowsubtvens.ga